Click here for Restaurant.com  -  $25 Restaurant.com Gift Cards for $15.


Author Topic: Smoked turkey  (Read 3326 times)

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3769
  • Learn something from everyone.
    • Email
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2012, 01:56:47 PM »
I just called Community Q to order a smoked ham for a Christmas get-together this Saturday, and they said they need at least 7 days notice to fill an order.  Very disappointing -- I was really looking forward to trying this ham.  Can anyone recommend another place that makes comparable smoked hams?  TIA.

Call Pine Street market and see if they have any....

   (404) 296-9672

....
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline LizR

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1354
    • Email
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2012, 10:40:10 AM »
I asked Community Que about availibility a week ago and they confirmed that they will only be available until Christmas. I'd like to serve a ham for New Year's day brunch but am leaving town on the 21st. Maybe I'll ask if they can hold one for me? If I picked it up on the 20th, do you think it would be ok sitting in the fridge for 11 days?

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3769
  • Learn something from everyone.
    • Email
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2012, 06:32:34 PM »
I asked Community Que about availibility a week ago and they confirmed that they will only be available until Christmas. I'd like to serve a ham for New Year's day brunch but am leaving town on the 21st. Maybe I'll ask if they can hold one for me? If I picked it up on the 20th, do you think it would be ok sitting in the fridge for 11 days?

I did do a bit of searching around but did not find a REAL answer.  I'd give CQ a call and ask, it is all about the type of cure and the method of smoking etc. 

....
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline outtolunchatty

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 85
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2012, 10:21:03 AM »
We ordered another smoked turkey for Christmas at community Q. It reheated easily on Christmas Day and was terrific again. For $40.00 per bird, truly a great deal.

Offline bettylouski

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 425
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2012, 03:35:15 PM »
We ordered another smoked turkey for Christmas at community Q. It reheated easily on Christmas Day and was terrific again. For $40.00 per bird, truly a great deal.


++++1

We had our first Community Q smoked turkey for Christmas Eve, tons of leftovers and so very delicious.  Ordered a ham for New Year's while I was there. . .

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3769
  • Learn something from everyone.
    • Email
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #20 on: March 26, 2013, 05:05:38 PM »


One of my buds is thinking about doing a turkey for Easter (and a leg of lamb)..


The question is, what is your take on brining a turkey?  Yes or No and why...


....
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline Daniel

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 199
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2013, 06:50:43 PM »
I like a turkey breast brined, but don't like the texture of brined dark meat. 

I've had success injecting, cover with cheese cloth and then butter baste.

Offline mikeinatl

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #22 on: March 29, 2013, 09:25:56 AM »


One of my buds is thinking about doing a turkey for Easter (and a leg of lamb)..


The question is, what is your take on brining a turkey?  Yes or No and why...


....

I always brine.  Even with a cheap turkey (I buy a lot of the Target brand bone in breasts frozen when they are $.99 a pound and just put them frozen into the brine and defrost in the brine for about 4 days) it makes them much more moist and flavorful.  My brine I use is:
1/2 cup kosher salt
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/8 cup agave nectar (or honey)
2 cups apple juice
water to cover the bird

Offline waynehoobler

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 86
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #23 on: March 31, 2013, 08:21:56 PM »


One of my buds is thinking about doing a turkey for Easter (and a leg of lamb)..


The question is, what is your take on brining a turkey?  Yes or No and why...


....

I've brined a few times.  I could never tell if it did much for the white meat.  I think it helps the dark meat.  Has the potential to be very messy if you accidentally splash things while moving/flipping the bird.  I pretty much ruined some suit pants while messing with my bird before work one year.

Cooks illustrated recommends just salting the bird (exact method can probably be found online).  I recall that it's crucial to loosen up the skin and get the salt under it.  Next time, I'm going to try their method, as I'm not sure that the brining was worth the hassle--but some sort of salting method must be used if using a 'natural' bird.

Offline Chocoholic

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 130
    • Email
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #24 on: April 01, 2013, 02:18:50 PM »
"Flipping the bird"...heh-heh.

Isn't the salting method you're describing called dry brining?  I thought Kez had written up a very good article a few years ago about trying that method, with great success, on his Thanksgiving bird.

Offline waynehoobler

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 86
Re: Smoked turkey
« Reply #25 on: April 02, 2013, 03:29:19 PM »
"Flipping the bird"...heh-heh.

Isn't the salting method you're describing called dry brining?  I thought Kez had written up a very good article a few years ago about trying that method, with great success, on his Thanksgiving bird.
Sometimes it's called that.  Or just 'salting'.  Also similar to koshering.  It likely packs the flavor punch of wet brining, but uses a lot less salt and no need for a heavy pot of brine+turkey.

There seems to be some dispute on whether to salt on or under the skin, but I can't see  how it'll penetrate through the skin.

Found it on a couple of sites:
http://kitchenmusings.com/2006/11/13/nobrine_turkey/
http://eggheadforum.com/discussion/767174/cooks-countrys-salted-turkey-recipe


 

Powered by EzPortal
anything
anything