Author Topic: capon  (Read 1128 times)

Offline Lorenzo

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capon
« on: December 29, 2011, 10:56:24 AM »
With all the recent talk about goose, we happened to spy a capon while we were eyeing up some frozen geese in our local Kroger.  We now possess one frozen capon and have no experience cooking one.  Any suggestions?

Offline Jmolinari

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Re: capon
« Reply #1 on: December 30, 2011, 06:07:18 AM »
Isn't capon a castrated rooster?
I think they're usually used for soup in Italy....served with tortellini for Xmas or New Years.

Offline Lorenzo

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Re: capon
« Reply #2 on: December 30, 2011, 07:00:46 AM »
Yep, a castrated rooster: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capon  They're popular to cook like turkeys and geese in some parts of the world.  I was surprised to see one in Kroger--I've only seen them in fancy food shops.

Offline HaagenDazs

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Re: capon
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2012, 07:46:34 PM »
I've seen them in the frozen bins at Kroger and Publix for years.  It is clearly a wet cooking method bird, Coq au Vin is the first thing that comes to mind.

Offline Lorenzo

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Re: capon
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2012, 07:46:19 AM »
I've seen them in the frozen bins at Kroger and Publix for years.  It is clearly a wet cooking method bird, Coq au Vin is the first thing that comes to mind.

Not what I've heard.  Coq au vin is a recipe designed to deal with an old, tough bird. Capon is, I believe, a young bird that's been, uh, treated in a way that supposedly makes the meat very tender.  We're making it this week, so we'll see.  Per the recipes we've found, we're treating it pretty much like a Thanksgiving turkey and roasting it.

Offline Jmolinari

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Re: capon
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2012, 03:13:58 PM »
Wiki says a capon is pretty old, if he's butchered young it tastes like chicken, so it's pointless... that's why they're expensive, they take longer to raise.

Offline MadBob

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Re: capon
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2012, 05:11:41 PM »
Isn't capon a castrated rooster?
I think they're usually used for soup in Italy....served with tortellini for Xmas or New Years.

Kinda makes you wonder if they are like chicken hearts. If you get enough of them can you make a meal out of them? Kinda like Rocky Mountain Oysters??
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Offline Lorenzo

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Re: capon
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2012, 08:08:56 PM »
Wiki says a capon is pretty old, if he's butchered young it tastes like chicken, so it's pointless... that's why they're expensive, they take longer to raise.

I don't see where Wiki says they're "pretty old."  From what I've read, a typical chicken goes to market in five weeks (thanks to the miracle of industrial poultry production), and a capon is fattened up over as long as 15 or 16 weeks.  But that's still a pretty young chicken relative to the old yardbirds that were traditionally relegated to stewing in dishes like coq au vin.
 
Anyway, to wrap this up, we roasted the capon tonight, using a recipe from Saveur reminiscent of a Thanksgiving turkey: roasted with some sage leaves under the skin, sage-and-bacon dressing on the side, etc.  The large bird made an impressive sight--like a really big chicken--and it would probably be fun to serve at a dinner gathering, but it just tasted like any other chicken to us.  Same flavor, same texture.  Maybe a little more moist.  A surpisingly large amount of fat rendered out--it's definitely a fattier bird than a typical turkey or, one might theorize, an equally large chicken.  It was not tough or coarse by any means.  That said, we're not poultry connoisseurs, and we don't discern much difference between industrially produced birds from Kroglix and fancy free-range birds and breeds like Poulet Rouge.  In summary, we both said we'd gladly do another one sometime.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2012, 08:10:47 PM by Lorenzo »

Offline Jmolinari

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Re: capon
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2012, 08:47:12 PM »
what
Isn't capon a castrated rooster?
I think they're usually used for soup in Italy....served with tortellini for Xmas or New Years.

Kinda makes you wonder if they are like chicken hearts. If you get enough of them can you make a meal out of them? Kinda like Rocky Mountain Oysters??

what? tortellini? true..there are never enough!

 

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