Author Topic: Leftovers for dinner  (Read 3793 times)

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Leftovers for dinner
« on: November 06, 2009, 03:42:05 PM »


I love to work with leftovers.  This one was a repeat meal mostly.  I figure it was about $2.00/serving or less as a leftover?

It was the pork Loin, with apple-cabbage, and Garlic Mashed Potatoes.  

I added some half-n-half to the mash, heated the apple-cabbage up in a chef's pan and put the pork on top to barely warm enough to eat.  It was terrific.

Here is one pic of the finished dish..  I know it's not too pretty, but it was way good.



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« Last Edit: November 06, 2009, 03:43:51 PM by GadgetGeek »
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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2009, 05:05:42 PM »
Leftovers often get turned into fried rice in our home. 

Chop up:
- onion
- garlic
- ginger
- mushrooms
- green beans
- bok choy
- oodles of other vegetables
- some eggs
- dark soy sauce / rice wine vinegar / sherry (shao xing wine) / undetermined Chinese pastes

And stir fry it in the wok.  I should post the real recipe later, even though it's imperfect.  Regardless, my family loves it.  Part of its yummyness comes from the fact that I cook it in a well-seasoned carbon-steel wok over a jet engine of a burner (which sits outside on my deck).  That makes "wok hay" (wok stench in Chinese) which, actually, smells progressively deliciouser the more the wok is used, and this flavor is imparted into the cooked food.

Oh, but all that chopping!  The food processor makes things easy here, but if I'm feeling guilty I'll cut it all by hand.  This particular version was supposed to have leftover smoked chicken thighs, but the frozen and unmarked cooked meat item turned out to be leftover thit nuong (Vietnamese grilled pork).

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2009, 05:47:31 PM »

I did a refrigerator inventory today.   What an eclectic mix of things.   ;D

I did toss over a dozen unidentifiable items, and had to do some hard smell checking and tasting on some other items that might not make the jump to light speed?

It seems like I am heavy on rice and LO mashed potatoes, with very few vegetables and a handful (2 meals worth) of protein? 

I hated to toss out the nearly solid buttermilk, but it's time had come.  I did find the smoked jalapenos that I made in July and they seem to be okay, and I'll keep them. 

I wish there was a good lablemaker on the front of the fridge so that I could label EVEYTHING that goes in and date it.....   Cumon you technical guys and gals...   invent me one...?

Like my Mom said..   "If you can't tell if it's meat or cake, throw it out"....

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Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2009, 07:05:52 PM »
Leftovers often get turned into fried rice in our home.

  <<big edit>>

And stir fry it in the wok.  I should post the real recipe later, even though it's imperfect.  Regardless, my family loves it.  Part of its yummyness comes from the fact that I cook it in a well-seasoned carbon-steel wok over a jet engine of a burner (which sits outside on my deck).  That makes "wok hay" (wok stench in Chinese) which, actually, smells progressively deliciouser the more the wok is used, and this flavor is imparted into the cooked food.

I should use my outdoor gas Wok Burner more.  I have only used it a few times this year.
I certainly do like having 85,000 btu's at my disposal, that Kings Kooker gas ring really is Kool...

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http://www.moderncontrol.com/kingskooker.htm

Oh, but all that chopping!  The food processor makes things easy here, but if I'm feeling guilty I'll cut it all by hand.  This particular version was supposed to have leftover smoked chicken thighs, but the frozen and unmarked cooked meat item turned out to be leftover thit nuong (Vietnamese grilled pork).

I'm with you..   sometimes there is "warmed up" leftovers with barely a change, or more often you can gather things together and make some marvelous meals out of the leftover items.  I like that.

I'd love to see the proportions?

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When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

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geonuc

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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2009, 03:43:44 AM »
I like to chop things up. Maybe I just like to play with knives.

I've been making fried rice lately myself, as a way to use up leftover rice.

Offline Marmite Loving Euniculus

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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2009, 05:22:38 PM »
Being so time strapped lately has taught me to cook big so we have leftovers the next day. Great time and budget saver.

Loundry

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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2009, 02:54:14 PM »
I'd love to see the proportions?

That's the tricky part.

Almost all of the mass in fried rice is mild-flavored foods.  Almost all of the flavor comes from the addition of the liquid matter.  Recently I started measuring this liquid matter.

2 times ago, it was 2T of dark soy sauce, 1T of rice vinegar, 2T of sherry.  (Not salty enough.)

1 time ago, it was 3T of dark soy sauce, 2T of rice vinegar, 3T of sherry, and 1T of broad bean paste.  (Beau thought this flavor was too strong and he disliked it, while the grown-ups thought it was delicious).

Finding something that pleases the whole family is always tricky.

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #7 on: February 08, 2010, 06:56:48 PM »

I'm about to go and make it real...


I read a nice recipe and ignored it during the prep of dinner.  
We WILL have some nice Grilled/Smoked Chicken thighs that are very flavorful, in a melange of peppers and onion with Farfel.
With that we are having some (first time cooking it) Sherlihon cooked just like it was Bok Choy, but a little less time...
This will be an eclectic, fusion meal with elements of Italy and China on two plates.

I did use some slivered Chinese sausage as a base for the Sherihon, some grated ginger, a single clove of garlic, went into the oil, and it is coming up on time to make it live..

The Farfalle (bow ties) were intentionally undercooked and will pick up the smoky, pepper flavor of the other things as we finish the dish.    

« Last Edit: February 08, 2010, 11:22:42 PM by Mike GadgetGeek Stock »
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Offline Foodgeek

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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #8 on: February 08, 2010, 07:39:22 PM »
The Farfel (bow ties) were intentionally undercooked and will pick up the smoky, pepper flavor of the other things as we finish the dish.   


Do you mean Farfalle?

When I first saw this post, I read the word Farfel and thought of Matzo Farfel. Link here. My mom would order it as a side sometimes when we went to Lou and Hy's in Akron. I loved the pickles they always had on the tables there.

I don't think I've heard anyone mention Matzo Farfel since I moved to Atlanta.
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Offline rwcohen

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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #9 on: February 08, 2010, 07:50:06 PM »
Apologies for posting about the gathering with Frank and Amy Ma over the weekend. This is about leftover. I had the opportunity to take the Shrimps w/Snow Pea Sprouts home the other night. I had them tonight along with tastes of the carrot cake and chocolate cake. The shrimp were delicious, however the carrot cake was the best I have ever had. While not a great fan of carrot cake since most are too sweet, this was perfect not too sweet but vet very rich. The pie was excellent, the carrot cake perfect but the chocolate cake won me over. Next time I need a super cake, I know where to go
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Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Leftovers for dinner
« Reply #10 on: February 08, 2010, 11:21:06 PM »
The Farfel (bow ties) were intentionally undercooked and will pick up the smoky, pepper flavor of the other things as we finish the dish.   


Do you mean Farfalle?

When I first saw this post, I read the word Farfel and thought of Matzo Farfel. Link here. My mom would order it as a side sometimes when we went to Lou and Hy's in Akron. I loved the pickles they always had on the tables there.

I don't think I've heard anyone mention Matzo Farfel since I moved to Atlanta.

Yes.  I'll fix it ...

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Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

 

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