Author Topic: Bread Making  (Read 9478 times)

Offline AndyBoy

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Bread Making
« on: November 07, 2009, 12:07:42 PM »
I just pulled these from my oven and my kitchen smells so good right now. Haven't baked in a while so these will definately be enjoyed. No sourdough here just a classic baguette recipe with flour, salt, water and yeast.

Offline Melomom

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2009, 09:31:50 PM »
I recently had some Alon's focaccia and it was really wonderful (of course).  Great olive oil and rosemary flavor.  Does anyone have a recipe they like?

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2009, 07:35:27 AM »
There is one in my Il Fornaio cookbook that Chef Lamar swears by. I will try to remember to get it for you when I go home for lunch.

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2009, 05:46:36 PM »
As I said I have never made this but everything from Il Fornaio has been fastastic. It is a great breadmaking book that Chef Lamar Thomas told be about.


Focaccia Alla Genovese

1/2 tsp dry yeast
1/2 cup water (105 degrees)
2 1/2 cups unbleached bread flour
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 cup cool water
1/4 cup Biga*
Olive oil

Add yeast to 1/2 cup of warm water and let it get foamy. Add flour and salt to a large bowl and add yeast mixture, water, biga and 1 Tbls olive oil. I use a KitchenAide, but after mixing knead 20 minutes with a couple of 1-2 minute rests. Let rise 1 1/2 hours. Punch down and let rise again for 45 minutes. Turn out onto a floured work surface and press out with your hands into a 8 inch square about 3/4 inches thick. Flip over onto a floured surface, cover with towel and let rise about 50 minutes. Preheat a 425 oven with stone. Mist oven with water, transfer bread to bakers peel and dimple surface with fingers. Brush top surface with olive oil, transfer bread to oven and mist again and then another mist in 5 minutes. Bread should be done in about 30 minutes and gets another coating of olive oil when done.


* The biga is made as follows:

1/4 tsp yeast
1/2 cup warm water
3 1/2 cups unbleached bread flour
1 1/4 cups cool water

Dissolve yeast in warm water until foamy. Add to flour with cool water and mix together. Let ferment 24 hours in the refrigerator before using. Spoon out amount needed and let come to room temperature before using. Biga will last 2 weeks in refrigerator.



Offline Melomom

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #4 on: December 10, 2009, 07:33:53 PM »
Thanks AndyBoy, I will have to give the focaccia a whirl.  I presume the biga appears in other recipes in that book - what else do you use it for?  Is is more for flavor or for rising, do you think?

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2009, 06:34:21 AM »
Thanks AndyBoy, I will have to give the focaccia a whirl.  I presume the biga appears in other recipes in that book - what else do you use it for?  Is is more for flavor or for rising, do you think?

The biga is both for flavor and rising, basically a sourdough starter. I got mine from Sourdough International and it was collected from Naples, Italy. They have starters from all over the world. My starter is several years old and I cranked it up last night after my post. Will be making bread this weekend although not sure which recipe yet.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2009, 08:34:46 AM by AndyBoy »

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #6 on: December 13, 2009, 09:37:57 AM »
Decided to do a sourdough whole wheat loaf today. I made a sponge last night from biga, whole wheat flour and water and it is kneading now. The recipe didn't call for any more yeast but I decided to give it a little "boost" with the addition of 1/2 tsp yeast.

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #7 on: December 13, 2009, 05:30:22 PM »
Decided to do a sourdough whole wheat loaf today. I made a sponge last night from biga, whole wheat flour and water and it is kneading now. The recipe didn't call for any more yeast but I decided to give it a little "boost" with the addition of 1/2 tsp yeast.

How does a sponge differ from a biga differ from a starter?

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #8 on: December 13, 2009, 05:43:27 PM »
Loundry I don't consider myself an expert bread baker by a long shot but I think a sponge is biga, which is more liquid, with added flour so it is like a soft dough. I think it probably gives a portion of the flour a headstart and added flavor. Some of the recipes in Il Fornaio mix all the ingredients at once and then they do a long overnight ferment in the frige to give extra flavor and dimension to the finished bread.

Here is my loaf that I took from the oven a little while ago. The crust is starting to develop cracks as it cools and I think that is just where it is supposed to be.

Offline Roxro

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2009, 10:18:54 AM »
Wow- Andy Boy, that is one good looking loaf of bread.  I did a foccacia last week for the first time in a few years and have wondering why I make it more often.  Very easy and super delicious.  I topped mine with olive oil, sea salt and Parm but I like fresh rosemary, too.  And carmelized onions or maybe a little garlic, too. 

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2010, 12:56:32 PM »
I saw a short video of Peter Reinhart giving a lecture on whole wheat breadmaking at a conference and last night I got his book on whole wheat breads using a technique he developed and had 350 different people testing recipes to get each one perfect. Just starting to get into the book but he is a good writer and speaker. I want to take my bread into a new direction and hopefully a little healthier one.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2010, 01:17:24 PM by AndyBoy »

Offline Northside Food

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #11 on: January 06, 2010, 09:06:31 PM »
I got the Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day book last year, and I find it indispensable. the recipes are so easy and the results so good, we end up eating more bread than we should. Especially on days like today, when i need any excuse to turn the oven on.
Northside Food- http://northsidefood.blogspot.com/

Updated 06-11-14

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #12 on: January 06, 2010, 11:57:47 PM »
I got the Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day book last year, and I find it indispensable. the recipes are so easy and the results so good, we end up eating more bread than we should. Especially on days like today, when i need any excuse to turn the oven on.

Jeff and Zoe are a hoot to cook with too, when they were here in Atlanta in 2008, they did a segment with Chefandthefatman at the Publix Cooking School in Alpharetta, they did a nice 2 hours worth of lessons plus a bunch of off the cuff things before and after.  We all (CnFM) subscribe to their method, but for me, and maybe it's just me, I honestly make better bread using my old, long, double rise method than the quicker way?

Here is a link to some of the pics we took during that very neat day.   I still talk with Zoe online once in a while, they are a busy enterprise and doing more shows and demo's than ever.  Gosh if they get more folks making honest-to-goodness bread, they are still stars in my sky.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/61922424@N00/sets/72157604243083090/

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Offline Northside Food

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #13 on: January 07, 2010, 03:21:50 PM »
Very cool!

And yeah, fresh baked bread has gone from an occasional "when I'm home for a break" thing to an almost weekly thing. My loaves aren't nearly as pretty as the ones Zoe makes, but that's all just practice. Some of my recent ones have been pretty good. And it all tastes good no matter what.
Northside Food- http://northsidefood.blogspot.com/

Updated 06-11-14

Offline bettylouski

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Re: Bread Making
« Reply #14 on: January 07, 2010, 03:28:20 PM »
I got the Artisan Bread in Five Minutes a Day book last year, and I find it indispensable.

+1  That book never even gets put back on the shelf, it is out on the counter all of the time.

 

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