Author Topic: Dry Aging Rib Roast Question  (Read 3623 times)

Offline Larkemon

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Dry Aging Rib Roast Question
« on: March 29, 2012, 05:40:05 PM »
So if I buy a rib roast from Publix tomorrow ($6.99/lb) and plan to cook it either on the April 7th or 8th, is it enough time to dry age it in the fridge?  Is there any benefit?  I keep reading that people should start out dry aging for 2 weeks.  Is it one of those it gets gross before it gets better things?

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Dry Aging Rib Roast Question
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2012, 07:47:27 AM »
So if I buy a rib roast from Publix tomorrow ($6.99/lb) and plan to cook it either on the April 7th or 8th, is it enough time to dry age it in the fridge?  Is there any benefit?  I keep reading that people should start out dry aging for 2 weeks.  Is it one of those it gets gross before it gets better things?

It should be fine, but do plan on cutting a fair amount off (trimming) so that the desiccated parts of the roast will not be eaten.

Yes there is a benefit, but I don't know if two weeks is long enough.  Why not buy a dry-aged roast?  Sure you have to track 'em down but they are done for longer, under controlled (usually) conditions and though you will also have to trim it some, you will see what 20+ day aging can do for a roast. 

....
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Offline Larkemon

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Re: Dry Aging Rib Roast Question
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2012, 08:01:36 AM »

So if I buy a rib roast from Publix tomorrow ($6.99/lb) and plan to cook it either on the April 7th or 8th, is it enough time to dry age it in the fridge?  Is there any benefit?  I keep reading that people should start out dry aging for 2 weeks.  Is it one of those it gets gross before it gets better things?

It should be fine, but do plan on cutting a fair amount off (trimming) so that the desiccated parts of the roast will not be eaten.

Yes there is a benefit, but I don't know if two weeks is long enough.  Why not buy a dry-aged roast?  Sure you have to track 'em down but they are done for longer, under controlled (usually) conditions and though you will also have to trim it some, you will see what 20+ day aging can do for a roast. 

....

Big reason for not buying a dry-aged roast is cost.  With it going the roasts on sale this week, I thought I might be able to pick one up and do it myself for a fraction of the cost.  I may just end up buying it and trimming them into rib-eye steaks to throw on the grill.  That way, we can spend the weekend with the family coming into town instead of babysitting a roast for hours.  Still debating.

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Dry Aging Rib Roast Question
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2012, 08:21:16 AM »

So if I buy a rib roast from Publix tomorrow ($6.99/lb) and plan to cook it either on the April 7th or 8th, is it enough time to dry age it in the fridge?  Is there any benefit?  I keep reading that people should start out dry aging for 2 weeks.  Is it one of those it gets gross before it gets better things?

It should be fine, but do plan on cutting a fair amount off (trimming) so that the desiccated parts of the roast will not be eaten.

Yes there is a benefit, but I don't know if two weeks is long enough.  Why not buy a dry-aged roast?  Sure you have to track 'em down but they are done for longer, under controlled (usually) conditions and though you will also have to trim it some, you will see what 20+ day aging can do for a roast. 

....

Big reason for not buying a dry-aged roast is cost.  With it going the roasts on sale this week, I thought I might be able to pick one up and do it myself for a fraction of the cost.  I may just end up buying it and trimming them into rib-eye steaks to throw on the grill.  That way, we can spend the weekend with the family coming into town instead of babysitting a roast for hours.  Still debating.

I might pick one up too, thanks.

....
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline HaagenDazs

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Re: Dry Aging Rib Roast Question
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2012, 08:49:54 AM »
I dry age mine if it's only for a week.  In other words something is better than nothing. I can't remember exactly but for Christmas I did one for 8 days and it lost about 8 ounces of weight (water).  And yes, $7 per pound is far better than $20+ per pound. So I say go for it. Worst case you have $7 per pound bone in dinosaur rib eyes... clean hacksaw blades work wonderfuly.

Offline LizR

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Re: Dry Aging Rib Roast Question
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2012, 12:09:24 PM »
Larkemon - how did it turn out?

Inspired by this thread we bought one of those Publix roasts and aged it in the fridge for a week. I overcooked it but it was mighty tasty anyway. Would definitely do it again. One note - I see folks online warning about dry aging in the fridge bc the humidity is too high and there is not enough air flow so things can spoil. We heavily salted the exterior and set the roast on a rack on a plate and it worked great. I think that the salt kept any problematic beasties from growing.

Recommend.

Offline Larkemon

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Re: Dry Aging Rib Roast Question
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2012, 02:08:05 PM »
Larkemon - how did it turn out?

Inspired by this thread we bought one of those Publix roasts and aged it in the fridge for a week. I overcooked it but it was mighty tasty anyway. Would definitely do it again. One note - I see folks online warning about dry aging in the fridge bc the humidity is too high and there is not enough air flow so things can spoil. We heavily salted the exterior and set the roast on a rack on a plate and it worked great. I think that the salt kept any problematic beasties from growing.

Recommend.

I really wanted to try it, but I didn't know what my parents wanted to do and was worried I wouldn't have time to roast.  In hindsight it was a good thing.  We ended up going to Golden House for dim sum, hitting up Great Wall market in Duluth (btw, really liked the market) and bopping around town.  No way I would have had time to do my preferred low and slow method.  Instead, we grilled some thick ribeyes and had some tomato/butter mussels.  Great meal really, but I'm just itching to try the dry age one day. 

Offline LizR

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Re: Dry Aging Rib Roast Question
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2012, 01:35:44 PM »
Cool. Please report back if you do!

 

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