Author Topic: Beef Brisket  (Read 7420 times)

Offline tansu

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2012, 02:31:08 PM »
Thanks for the idea and the suggestions.
I was happy with my results - I was lucky and/or have low standards.

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2012, 05:15:00 PM »
Thanks for the idea and the suggestions.
I was happy with my results - I was lucky and/or have low standards.

I'm doing mine tomorrow, I did a Chef and the Fatman show today and don't want to fiddle with the brisket.

Let's hope that mine turns out fine, I gave it enough time and effort.

.....
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Offline MadBob

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2012, 07:38:56 AM »
At 5 or so both briskets were tender and delicious, so I took them out and cooked  the veggies. Then I put the beef back in the water to warm up with the heat off. I probably left them in there for about 10 min until we were ready to eat. Unfortunately, when I started carving them into slices, they got tougher and tougher as I was cutting. Either they somehow siezed-up from the second heating, or I did not let them rest long enough. They were still tasty but not very tender. Won't do that again.
Did you buy a Flat Cut or a Point Cut? When carving the Flat did you cut across the grain? Maybe your cooking time was a little short. Just asking!
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Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #18 on: March 18, 2012, 12:38:18 PM »
At 5 or so both briskets were tender and delicious, so I took them out and cooked  the veggies. Then I put the beef back in the water to warm up with the heat off. I probably left them in there for about 10 min until we were ready to eat. Unfortunately, when I started carving them into slices, they got tougher and tougher as I was cutting. Either they somehow siezed-up from the second heating, or I did not let them rest long enough. They were still tasty but not very tender. Won't do that again.
Did you buy a Flat Cut or a Point Cut? When carving the Flat did you cut across the grain? Maybe your cooking time was a little short. Just asking!

I cut a notch in the side I want to slice before the brisket goes into the brine or on to cook so I can tell which way to slice.  I gotta think that LizR is slicing it the right way, she is a pro..  ;)

...
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

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Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #19 on: March 19, 2012, 09:59:42 AM »


Even though mine was not salty, and did have a bit of flavor I still don't care for boiled meat.  As a traditional dinner it turned out well enough.  I'm glad I did the step-by-step process to see if might have done things wrong in the past.

I'll do the other end of the brisket as Pastrami and may like it sliced thinly as sandwich meat.  I'm just not going to do them again.  Irish stew next year. 

....
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Offline MadBob

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #20 on: March 20, 2012, 12:01:38 PM »
Richard mentioned he was ordering some "Koby" brisket, and he was also talking about making pastrami from it.

Have you ever listened to someone for a while and wondered, who ties your shoelaces?

You can't do epic shit with basic people.

Beer is why I get up every afternoon.

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Beef Brisket Into Pastrami.
« Reply #21 on: March 28, 2012, 03:39:40 PM »
On to the next step in brisket and that is making Pastrami.   

I am going to cut and paste this whole recipe/method, take what you need or want from it.

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http://amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/close_to_katzs_home_made_pastrami.html


How Meathead makes pastrami

To do it all the way from scratch there are several time consuming steps:

    Cure the beef.
    Soak the corned beef.
    Rub and let is sit.
    Smoke the corned beef.
    Let it sit.
    Steam it and serve.

You can eliminate the first step by buying a good corned beef. But making your own corned beef and turning it into pastrami means that you can make it to your taste. Like cloves? Gahead. Want sugar in the rub? I won't tell on you. Want more smoke? Who's gonna stop you? More pepper? Bless you. Trust me, boychik, do it yourself and you will eat shards of meat packed with spicy flavor and silky richness mit groys fargenign. Surprisingly, the smoke wraps its fingers into everything without being obvious. Forgive me if I kvell.

Here. I'll spill the whole megillah:
Recipe for Close to Katz's Pastrami

Makes. About 3 pounds of pastrami after shrinkage, enough for 4 good sandwiches
Preparation time. Oy!
Cooking time. 6 hours approximately to smoke it plus 2 hours to simmer it, total 6 hours
Serve with. Latkes and kosher dill pickled tomatoes

Ingredients
4 pounds of good corned beef, preferably home made (click for recipe)
4 tablespoons fresh coarsely ground black pepper
2 tablespoons coriander powder
1 teaspoon mustard powder
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 tablespoon paprika
2 teaspoons garlic powder
2 teaspoons onion powder
4 to 8 ounces of smoke wood

About store bought corned beef. Corned beef comes in two forms, ready to eat, and brined. Ready to eat corned beef is cured, then cooked, and usually packaged in slices or sliced at the deli counter. Do not use this! Brined corned beef is usually a hunk of brisket that has been cured in a salt solution and packaged in a hearty cryovac plastic bag with some of the brine. It has not been cooked yet. That's the stuff you want.

About the rub. The paprika mostly adds color. If you want to veer from the conventional and amp it up a bit, substitute ancho powder or chili powder, but be careful, the black pepper and mustard supply an ample kick. You can leave anything out that you want except the black pepper and the coriander.

Do this
1) Make your own corned beef. It is just plain better than storebought. For pastrami, the flat section of the brisket is favored by many because it makes nice even slices for sandwiches, but I prefer the point section of the brisket because it is fattier, richer, and more tender. Yes, it sometimes breaks apart, but who notices on a sammy? If you can get it, go for navel (a.k.a. plate). But it can also be made from flank steak, or leaner cuts. If you are using brisket, one side of the meat will probably have a thick layer of fat on it called the cap. Remove all of the fat cap except about 1/8" and if there is any filmy membrane on the other side, remove it all. That thin layer of fat is important. The process takes about a week.

2) Desalinate. Submerge the corned beef in cold water in the fridge for about at least 8 hours. Change the water every 2 or 3 times. This removes excess salt. Trust me, you need to do this or you will be gulping water all night after your meal.

3) Rub. Make the rub by blending together all the spices. Rinse the meat, pat it dry with paper towels, coat it with a thin layer of cooking oil, apply the rub liberally and press it into the surface to help it adhere. If there is a thin part of meat, use less rub. Put in the fridge for a couple of days.

4) Smoke. Set up your smoker or your grill for smoking. You will find instructions for this in my Tips & Techniques section. If you can, use a charcoal smoker. It produces a deeper darker crust than gas, electric, or even pellets. Preheat to 225°F. Pick your wood. I don't think it makes a huge difference with all the other flavors banging around in there. My best batch was with cherry wood. Smoke it fat-side up over indirect heat at 225°F for about 3 to hours. You can then finish it outdoors or indoors at 225°F by taking it up to 170 to 190°F internal. Add wood when the smoke dwindles.

5) Chill. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 12 hours. You can keep it for a week if you wish. That's what Katz's does so that's what I do.

6) Steam. When it is time to serve it is time to heat and tenderizing. If you have a bamboo or metal steamer in which the meat will fit, you can use that. If not, take large hunks, not slices, and put it on a wire rack in a baking pan. Pour water in the pan right up to the rack, but don't get the meat wet or the rub will wash off. Cover with foil but don't let the foil touch the meat. The salt might interact and create electrical charges that can melt the foil. Put the pan on a burner, turn on the heat, and steam it an hour until heated through, adding hot water as needed, making sure the pan never dries out.

Optional: Braising. Put the meat in a pot, pan, or slow cooker and add hot water until the meat is only 1/4 to 1/3 submerged. Then put on a cover and bring it to a a very low gentle simmer for at least 3 hours refilling with water as needed. This will wash off some of the spices, but not to worry, there will be plenty of flavor because the simmering will help them penetrate the meat.

7) Slicing. Slicing is crucial to maximize tenderness. Look at the meat and notice which way the grain is running. Cut it by hand in thin slices, about 1/8" thick, perpendicular to the grain. If you cut parallel to the grain it will be much chewier. Don't try to slice it with a machine. It will just fall apart.

8) Serve. I serve it on fresh untoasted rye bread with a good mustard on both slices and a few shreds of sauerkraut. At Katz's they put about 1 pound of meat on each sandwich, and the Carnegie Deli uses even more. That's just too much for me devour without unhinging my jaw. 1/2 to 3/4 pound per sandwich is more than enough for home use. If you want, you can make a Rockin' Pastrami Reuben with sauerkraut, melted swiss, and thousand island dressing. Reubens were originally made with corned beef, but there's no rule that you can't make one from pastrami. In fact, I highly recommend it.

9) Leftovers freeze well and they can be reheated in the microwave or steamed. They can also be made into a killer hash. Ess, bench, sei a mensch!


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« Last Edit: March 28, 2012, 03:43:44 PM by Mike GadgetGeek Stock »
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

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Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #22 on: March 28, 2012, 06:05:15 PM »


I am doing a one-day rinse of the point of the brisket that has been in the brine since 3/12.  I rinsed it good and gave it two exchanges today, it is in plain filtered water and waiting for a water change tomorrow and a spice rub.  I should smoke this on Friday and serve it on Monday.

....
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #23 on: March 11, 2013, 11:20:57 AM »


Lamb is pretty Irish isn't it, I just don't want to fiddle with a brisket or two and end up saying I don't like brisket.

I have the goods to make a killer Irish stew, I think that will be my path this St. Patty's day. 


Who among you are doing corned beef this year?

......
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline LizR

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #24 on: March 11, 2013, 01:18:47 PM »
I love corned beef way too much to not do it. We always have a few folks over and do the whole boiled dinner thing. This year we are doing a dry brine from Cook's Illustrated that we've done before, and I'll also do a "regular" one, or two, from the grocery store.

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #25 on: March 11, 2013, 04:25:10 PM »
I love corned beef way too much to not do it. We always have a few folks over and do the whole boiled dinner thing. This year we are doing a dry brine from Cook's Illustrated that we've done before, and I'll also do a "regular" one, or two, from the grocery store.

Okay LizR, I might do one again this year as Deanne also likes it.  I might not brine it/corn it myself this year...

I'll look up that CI recipe and maybe make that one.

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« Last Edit: March 12, 2013, 11:11:44 AM by Mike GadgetGeek Stock »
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Beef Brisket
« Reply #26 on: March 17, 2015, 02:05:00 PM »

Sometimes I don't know whether this is self punishment or not, but I DO have a corned beef flat on the stove for later tonight. 

I just found out I have a meeting at 6:30, I don't know which one I'll give up.. 

with it are :

carrots, turnips, cabbage, potatoes, scallions, onions X2, and some herbage. 



....   
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

 

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