Author Topic: Cooking with your SO  (Read 5957 times)

Offline Foodgeek

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 926
  • Half of what I say is meaningless.
    • The Food Tutor
    • Email
Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #30 on: March 16, 2010, 11:57:52 AM »
Since he is actually using an uncooked custard, which differs from the "milk and beaten egg" by using more fat and a lot more sugar, . .

Well, that could be true, unless it isn't. Actually, I can make a custard using evaporated skim milk and egg beaters, producing a custard that has exactly zero fat in it. And it does take a little bit of sugar to make the custard for creme brulee, but let's face it: The reason people eat creme brulee is for the crunchy sugar on top. If you make the custard too sweet, you don't get a good contrast in texture and flavor and you entirely defeat the purpose of the dessert.

Conversely, if you're someone like me who keeps heavy cream around at all times because it's what I put in my coffee, you might be using heavy cream, or half and half, or whole milk, or whatever you prefer to make your French Toast. Also, you can use all yolks, or just whites, or a mixture of whole eggs and yolks, or whole eggs and whites to make French Toast. Also, the best recipe I know of for French Toast - the completely hands-off recipe that involves no cooking whatsoever, other than to throw all of the ingredients in a pan and toss it into the oven, then go read something until it's done - makes its own syrup/caramel-y sugar "creme-brulee" topping in the bottom of the pan, so you don't even have to do the extra step of putting sugar on top and tossing it under the broiler. I'd say that recipe calls for significantly more sugar than I'd usually put into creme brulee.

So what this chef really means when he says "creme brulee batter" is actually, "I'm going to make a mixture of some sort of milk/dairy product with eggs and some sugar that may have more fat in it than you normally put in French Toast, but it might also have less, and it might have more sugar than you normally put in French Toast, but it might have less. But mainly it's better because I'm French."

The "and you suck" bit at the end is actually just optional.  :D
Food is my favorite.

Loundry

  • Guest
Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #31 on: March 16, 2010, 07:55:23 PM »
And it does take a little bit of sugar to make the custard for creme brulee, but let's face it: The reason people eat creme brulee is for the crunchy sugar on top.

That may be true for some, but I love a good (read: non-eggy) custard.  The crunchy sugar ought be the plus on that A.

Eggy custard is an automatic, unfixable F.

Quote
So what this chef really means when he says "creme brulee batter" is actually, "I'm going to make a mixture of some sort of milk/dairy product with eggs and some sugar that may have more fat in it than you normally put in French Toast, but it might also have less, and it might have more sugar than you normally put in French Toast, but it might have less. But mainly it's better because I'm French."

We all have our little things about food and chefs that get under our skin.  Me, I'm not so bothered by a French chef using the phrase "creme brulee batter".  Myself, I'm bothered by foodies who eat a steaming plate of lung 'n' bung and then think they are special because they're eating off the "secret Chinese menu".  I have a phrase for that phenomenon, but it's impolite.

Isn't this about cooking with one's SO?  We're waaaay off topic now.

 

Powered by EzPortal
anything
anything
anything
anything
anything