Author Topic: Cooking with your SO  (Read 6245 times)

Offline mikeamor

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2010, 08:32:03 AM »
I do the majority of the cooking.  Sometimes the other half will play sous chef if I am getting busy.
Thinking carefully about this, I know that I really love working with food and it is one of the ways I relax.
I enjoy discussing the process and what is going on and what variations/opportunities there are with a meal and that can be seen as interfering or criticizing when someone else is doing the cooking.  The other half is not inept in the kitchen by any means but he tends toward easier "semi home made" solutions that are not my style and I have to force myself to not hover if I have completely relinquished  the kitchen.

Unfortunately, a conclusion is usually the place where you got tired of thinking.

Loundry

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #16 on: February 28, 2010, 10:31:20 AM »
The thing I hate most about cooking with my SO?  "I'm sorry, I need to get in that drawer in front of you."  We have no solution to this constant frustration.

Offline totm

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #17 on: February 28, 2010, 01:04:07 PM »
The thing I hate most about cooking with my SO?  "I'm sorry, I need to get in that drawer in front of you."  We have no solution to this constant frustration.
Hmm, I kind of like those times my SO wants to get in my drawers in front of me.
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Offline Beerbitch

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #18 on: February 28, 2010, 03:18:45 PM »
The thing I hate most about cooking with my SO?  "I'm sorry, I need to get in that drawer in front of you."  We have no solution to this constant frustration.

Well, we try to a utensil mis en place as well as an ingredient one.  We're lucky to have a stove where you can cook from opposite  sides.  But that still doesn't stop the questioning glances.

I prefer to take turns cooking....

Offline Melomom

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #19 on: February 28, 2010, 05:35:54 PM »
I cook, he watches appreciatively and keeps me company, pours the wine, enjoys the finished dish very much, does the dishes after.  I like it!

Offline uOTPia Dweller

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2010, 06:06:51 PM »
I bring home the bacon, partner cooks it. That's the way it should be and that's how it shall remain.

I only cook if I can push numbers on my True Cook Plus microwave.
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Offline Foodgeek

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #21 on: February 28, 2010, 07:24:48 PM »
The thing I hate most about cooking with my SO?  "I'm sorry, I need to get in that drawer in front of you."  We have no solution to this constant frustration.

There is a "U" and an "I" in Communication. Restaurant folks deal with this all the time, and they have a system in place. "Behind you," "Coming around hot," "On your back!" Make it a game to shout out these sorts of things when you need someone to get out of your way. You can leave the restaurant lingo in the kitchen and go back to talking like regular people the rest of the time that you socialize, but it's actually kind of fun.

"Pardon me," just really doesn't cut it in this situation.

I'd make a crack about how, if Cal's wife cooks bacon for him all the time, why does he constantly lust after restaurant food? But I won't. Because I'm nice like that.  ;)

(French toast?)
Food is my favorite.

Offline uOTPia Dweller

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #22 on: February 28, 2010, 07:51:03 PM »
Gospel of uOTPian dining http://scoopotp.com/author/joe-duffy/

Offline Foodgeek

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #23 on: February 28, 2010, 08:06:54 PM »
Food is my favorite.

Offline uOTPia Dweller

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2010, 08:30:21 PM »
.

And creme brulee is a custard, not a batter.

Somebody should tell this guy:

dipped in our creme brulee batter

http://douceurdefrance.com/breakfast_today.htm

Oh, I forgot and make homemade whipped cream better than just about anyone can.



Baking bread at home is fun and rewarding,

It ain't for me. In my spare time, I'd rather take my kids to the park or read them a book, neither of which I desire to pay anyone else to do.

It's especially rewarding when they read to me. How can kneading dough possibly be as rewarding as that? It's not even close.

I guess people should not order beer or wine at a restaurant because it's pretty easy and MUCH, MUCH cheaper to pour it at home.

I only order coffee at a restaurant once in a blue moon because I can brew Cafe Britt or Illy at home in minutes and much cheaper than I could at any restaurant. But if it required the time and effort as making bread--and I think the latter takes a lot more skill--I'd pay somebody else.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2010, 08:10:15 AM by uOTPia Dweller »
Gospel of uOTPian dining http://scoopotp.com/author/joe-duffy/

Loundry

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #25 on: February 28, 2010, 11:26:46 PM »
There is a "U" and an "I" in Communication.

Well, yeah, that's what my quotation marks were intending to convey.  My point is, it always seems that whatever station I'm working at has a drawer underneath it that contains the utensil he needs, and vice versa.  I think the ultimate solution is going to have to be to move the pile of least-used utensils into the drawer below the most-used station.  Also, we have a galley kitchen, so going from the sink to the range (which are across from each other) often risks colliding with the other.  Oh hell, I just want a bigger kitchen.  One with a fireplace large enough to cook a hog in.

Offline Foodgeek

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2010, 08:39:25 AM »

Baking bread at home is fun and rewarding,

It ain't for me. In my spare time, I'd rather take my kids to the park or read them a book, neither of which I desire to pay anyone else to do.

Actually, what I said right after that in that same sentence was that, while I've made French toast with bread that I made myself, I find that it's totally not worth it for that purpose. If you're going to bake your own bread, do it because you want fresh, homemade bread. In my opinion, you're way better off just using the bread you have in your kitchen to make French toast. If you're partial to brioche French toast, just make sure you have some brioche lying around.

But now that you mention it, my favorite memories from childhood are of cooking with my mom in the kitchen. I don't remember my parents ever reading to me - I taught myself to read when I was 3 so there was no need - but I lovingly remember making rugelach with my mother, and she isn't even a really good cook.

The guy who wrote that website obviously doesn't speak English as his first language, so that explains the "batter" thing. "Creme brulee batter" is market speak for "we added a splash of vanilla extract to the milk and eggs before we soaked the stale bread in it." If it really were a batter, rather than the same milk and eggs that every single recipe for French toast calls for - it's basically a moron-proof custard - it would have flour in it, which wouldn't make sense because creme brulee doesn't have flour in it.

And who doesn't make their own whipped cream?
Food is my favorite.

Loundry

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #27 on: March 14, 2010, 08:50:41 PM »
The guy who wrote that website obviously doesn't speak English as his first language, so that explains the "batter" thing. "Creme brulee batter" is market speak for "we added a splash of vanilla extract to the milk and eggs before we soaked the stale bread in it." If it really were a batter, rather than the same milk and eggs that every single recipe for French toast calls for - it's basically a moron-proof custard - it would have flour in it, which wouldn't make sense because creme brulee doesn't have flour in it.

Well yes, technically that is true.  But I think what he's trying to convey is "I dipped the bread in uncooked custard, specifically, a creme brulee custard", but it's shorter to write, "creme brulee batter", incorrect as that is.

Speaking of cooking with one's SO, we have made our own french toast dipped in "creme brulee batter" using homemade sourdough bread, and it is righteous.  Creme brulee is brain dead easy to mix ... the hard part is cooking it to the right temperature, and the only thing hard about that is being able to position a probe directly in the center of the ramekin, directly in the center of the custard, without the tip of the probe touching the bottom of the ramekin.  Of course, that task would require the use of a clamp which, apparently exists only in my fervid imagination.

You know, a pot clamp that can:

1. Hold sturdily to the side of the pot (or, in this case, the side of the roasting pan)
2. Hold sturdily to the probe
3. Be able to connect #1 (above) to #2 (above) sturdily and at an arbitrary angle

I mean, it's not like I'm demanding that someone make a chamber vacuum sealer for under $99.

Offline Foodgeek

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #28 on: March 15, 2010, 06:20:35 AM »
But I think what he's trying to convey is "I dipped the bread in uncooked custard, specifically, a creme brulee custard", but it's shorter to write, "creme brulee batter", incorrect as that is.

Well, yes. He dipped the bread in uncooked custard, which is basically exactly the same recipe as every single other recipe for French Toast in existence, the only variations being what amount of fat you use in the milk or cream. The reason for using the words "creme brulee batter" (something which doesn't exist) would be so that suburbanites  who don't get out much and don't know how to cook very well would see that and say, "Oooooooh! This is gonna' be good honey! Cuz' the Chef is all French and shit."

Quote
Creme brulee is brain dead easy to mix ... the hard part is cooking it to the right temperature, and the only thing hard about that is being able to position a probe directly in the center of the ramekin, directly in the center of the custard, without the tip of the probe touching the bottom of the ramekin.  Of course, that task would require the use of a clamp which, apparently exists only in my fervid imagination.

I really don't understand this part, because I make custards all the time. Yes, they are harder than making French Toast, but I've never really needed to use a thermometer of any kind. I just visually check them, or check them with a knife, and they always turn out just fine. And then you just sprinkle sugar on top and put it under the broiler to caramelize. Easy-peasy.

I don't even own a probe thermometer, and my candy thermometer broke about 8 years ago, and I never replaced it.
« Last Edit: March 15, 2010, 07:52:08 AM by Foodgeek »
Food is my favorite.

Loundry

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Re: Cooking with your SO
« Reply #29 on: March 15, 2010, 08:22:47 PM »

 

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