Author Topic: Brauereisterben  (Read 1078 times)

Offline The_Scientist

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 531
  • $750 as is, you pay the towing
    • Email
Brauereisterben
« on: March 02, 2011, 11:39:15 AM »
http://www.slate.com/id/2286897

Germany's beer industry is falling fast according to this. Even though the Rheinheitsgebot restrictions on brewing have been legally abolished since 1993, most brewers still adhere to them and refuse to innovate. Meanwhile young Germans are turning away from beer entirely in favor of spirits, alcopops and (shudder) energy drinks. Older consumers mostly turn up their noses at Belgian ales and American style craft brews. A few brave souls are trying to change that, but they have their work cut out for them.

I think it will go like it did here when the craft beer revolution started in the 1980's. At first it will be a fringe phenomenon, then a hip trend, then a mainstream success. When you offer a good product, the market will find it eventually.
"Crayons taste like purple" - Tardy the Turtle

Offline jpellett251

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 393
    • Atlanta Beer
    • Email
Re: Brauereisterben
« Reply #1 on: March 02, 2011, 01:11:15 PM »
I thought this was a weird statement from the author: "No one wants to go back to the Dark Ages when beer was murky, dark, sour, and smoky."

Really?  Many of of those are the things people are looking for now.

Offline Lorenzo

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 863
Re: Brauereisterben
« Reply #2 on: March 02, 2011, 01:20:45 PM »
As soon as the upstart brewers realize how huge the craft beer export market is, things will take off, as they have for some Belgian brewers.  As I've mentioned before, there are Belgian beers that are much more difficult to find in Belgium than they are in the US, because the market is limited there.  It doesn't matter that the average German no longer drinks much beer or that the styles have been rigidly defined in the past.  The country has enormous brewing expertise, not to mention the business resources, to make it huge in the craft beer export market.  Cook up some Imperial Kolsch or whatever and Americans will clamor for it.

 

Powered by EzPortal
anything
anything
anything