Author Topic: Rib Roast  (Read 5794 times)

Offline LizR

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Rib Roast
« on: December 10, 2010, 02:20:25 PM »
How do you cook yours? Low and slow? Sear first? Sear at the end? High and then turn it down?

Offline HaagenDazs

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2010, 03:03:14 PM »
Whatever you do they are on sale right now at Publix for $6 per pound!

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2010, 03:31:37 PM »
Whatever you do they are on sale right now at Publix for $6 per pound!

Is it too early to buy one and let it age in the back fridge until Christmas ?
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Offline LizR

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #3 on: December 10, 2010, 04:48:05 PM »
Whatever you do they are on sale right now at Publix for $6 per pound!

Hence the question! :0)

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #4 on: December 11, 2010, 07:55:09 AM »
Ann Burelle had a recent show on FN that I recorded and watched. She started it at 450 for 30 minutes and then down to 350 for 1 1/2 to 2 hours to finish. You could get the recipe from Food Network but I think she made a rub with rosemary, garlic, chili flakes, salt and pepper. Looked really good.

Offline Larkemon

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #5 on: December 11, 2010, 08:31:34 AM »

Offline LizR

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #6 on: December 11, 2010, 11:14:08 AM »
I plan on trying the Serious Eats method this Xmas. 

http://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html

Yes, I saw that also. Since I love Kenji so much, I will try that as well at some point.

BTW - it was just ok. I think if we had cooked it a bit more, it would have been more tender. However, sometimes on-sale beef from Publix (or Kroger) is not so delicious no matter what you do - other times it is just fine. Maybe we just had a bad hunk of cow.

Anyone made a restaurant-style prime rib at home? I wonder how they get them so tender. I will investigate.

Offline HaagenDazs

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #7 on: December 11, 2010, 06:21:02 PM »
Whatever you do they are on sale right now at Publix for $6 per pound!

Is it too early to buy one and let it age in the back fridge until Christmas ?
.

I'm not sure Mike...  I've aged one in my fridge before but it was only for about a week.  Worst case you might have some extra leathery surface spots that might need to be sliced off but who knows.  What I remember from last year, Publix runs this special for quite a while so I bet you could wait and buy one later next week some time at the same price.

Offline Foodgeek

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #8 on: December 15, 2010, 06:13:40 AM »
I did a 4-pound, 2-bone rib roast from Publix last night in the oven and it turned out very well, I thought. Rubbed the outside with salt, pepper, dry mustard, paprika, cayenne and thyme, then roasted in a shallow pan at 325 for an hour and 45 minutes. Took it out and "rested" the meat for about 15 minutes while I prepared vegetables and we ate French Onion soup as our appetizer, then put it back in the oven at 500 to set the crust.

We cut the roast in half and found a spot in the very center that was just a little too rare (for The Scientist, not for me), so I seared it for a second in the pan and we divvied up. It was a feast, with half left over for tonight's dinner, and the only thing I'd do differently is I'd put a little less salt in my rub. The pan juices were really salty and not usable. Still a very good meal, though.
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Offline Melomom

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #9 on: December 16, 2010, 12:33:42 PM »
Standing rib roast with Yorkshire pudding was my family's traditional Christmas dinner, think I will have to make it this year after reading these posts.  My mother made the pudding the old-fashioned way, with the beef drippings, though it's good with butter also.  Never too many leftovers after that dinner!

Offline Porky Linkster

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #10 on: December 16, 2010, 06:43:42 PM »
Standing rib with Yorkshire pudding has been our family tradition for countless years.  My wife is a strong adherent my late Mom's preference for "yorkie" prep with drippings to maximize the beefy flavor.  Ladle on some wine-deglazed jus-based gravy and Mmmmm, pure heaven.  We usually make three large muffin tins for six adults and 3 children and none of it goes to waste. In fact my son-in-law says he much prefers Christmas dinner at our house to his own mother's traditional roast turkey and cornbread stuffing.  :)

My wife even saves any left over drippings in case I get an urge for more Yorkshire pudding.  Truth be told, my waistline couldn't afford it, although I'd like to see what the drippings could do for some home made fwench fwies.

For the roast, we've ordered from Loebel's, Allen Brothers, Harry's/Whole Foods, Sawicki's and Publix and honestly, I've found it's the luck of the draw when it comes to the result.  I'd be hard-pressed to tell much difference between the $90 Publix we ordered last year and the $300 Allen Bros the year before.  OTOH, I have a warm spot in my heart for Allen Brothers - a few years ago a 14-lb rib roast was delayed in transit due to weather.  Aleen Bros promptly sent out another at no charge and told us to keep both - both of which arrived on the same day.

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #11 on: December 16, 2010, 08:57:35 PM »
Standing rib with Yorkshire pudding has been our family tradition for countless years.  My wife is a strong adherent my late Mom's preference for "yorkie" prep with drippings to maximize the beefy flavor.  Ladle on some wine-deglazed jus-based gravy and Mmmmm, pure heaven.  We usually make three large muffin tins for six adults and 3 children and none of it goes to waste. In fact my son-in-law says he much prefers Christmas dinner at our house to his own mother's traditional roast turkey and cornbread stuffing.  :)

My wife even saves any left over drippings in case I get an urge for more Yorkshire pudding.  Truth be told, my waistline couldn't afford it, although I'd like to see what the drippings could do for some home made fwench fwies.

For the roast, we've ordered from Loebel's, Allen Brothers, Harry's/Whole Foods, Sawicki's and Publix and honestly, I've found it's the luck of the draw when it comes to the result.  I'd be hard-pressed to tell much difference between the $90 Publix we ordered last year and the $300 Allen Bros the year before.  OTOH, I have a warm spot in my heart for Allen Brothers - a few years ago a 14-lb rib roast was delayed in transit due to weather.  Aleen Bros promptly sent out another at no charge and told us to keep both - both of which arrived on the same day.

If you don't mind, tell me about the Yorkies?  Let us all know how you make them, what you look for as you make them.  Let us know what pan, what oil, and what temperature you use making Yorkies?  Let us know if the batter is close or looser than pancake batter ? Let us know how long you let the batter sit and if you let it sit in the refrigerator?
I am a pretty fair hand with a joint of beef, or a rack.   I am less informed about the Yorkshire pudding and how and when you serve it ?  I have entertained whether I'd make 'em this year ?
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« Last Edit: December 16, 2010, 08:59:29 PM by Mike GadgetGeek Stock »
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline Porky Linkster

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #12 on: December 17, 2010, 07:31:01 AM »
Happy to do so.  Here's a list of the ingredients to serve 12:

9 large eggs
4.5 cups whole milk
4.5 cups (71/2 oz) unbleached all-purpose flour (I prefer King Arthur)
2 1/2 teaspoons table salt
~9 tablespoons roast drippings

Tools:

3 standard 12-cup muffin tins (we use Farberware non-stick) or for extra-large puddings we substitute a 6-cup Bakers Secret non-stick Texas muffin pan for one of the 12-cup pans.

One large and one medium mixing bowl

Whisk

Something to pour the batter with minimum spillage:  The Oxo Good Grips 4-cup angled measuring cup works well or if you're a precision-freak, the Traex Batter Boss does a great job (if pricey).

Prep

I think the key to getting the yorkies to rise properly is making sure all ingredients are at room temperature, so I'll take the eggs and milk out to rest about 1 hour 45 min before my estimated prep time.  For a 14-lb bone-in standing rib, that means an hour after the roast goes in the oven (figuring a 14-lb roast @ 16 minutes/lb at 350 deg = 3 hours 45 min for rare/med rare).

An hour before the roast is done:

Whisk eggs and milk in large bowl until well combined, about 20 seconds.  Next, whisk flour and salt in medium bowl and add to egg & milk mixture; whisk quickly until flour is just incorporated and mixture is smooth, about 30 seconds. Cover batter with plastic wrap and let stand at room temperature until the roast is done.


After removing the roast from the oven, spoon off at least 9 tablespoons of fat drippings and reserve.  While roast is resting (we typically use a target of 45 minutes), whisk 3 tablespoons of the fast drippings into the batter until bubbly and smooth. 

Next, move rack to center of oven if necessary, increase oven temp to 450 degrees and add at least a 1/2 tsp of the drippings to each cup of a standard muffin pan.  I like to make sure the sides get coated, as well as the bottom, so I'm probably a little more generous.  Place the muffin pan(s) in the oven to heat for 3 minutes to heat - the drippings will definitely smoke.

Next, remove the pans from the oven, close the oven door, and working quickly, divide the batter evenly into the muffin cups, filling each to 2/3 - 3/4 full and return to the oven immediately. Note: this is really a two-person job, with one person pouring batter and another handling the pans.  Place muffin pans side-by side in the oven, but do not stack for best results. 

Once the pans are in the oven, bake for 20 minutes and then reduce heat to 350 deg for another 10 minutes or until golden brown. Keep an eye on their progress  - you should see a nice rise, but don't let them burn.  DO NOT open the oven door for any reason until the yorkies are done.

Once out of the oven pierce each yorkie with a skewer to release steam and prevent collapse.  Serve immediately with roast and liberal helpings of gravy. 

Enjoy.  :)




 


 



Offline Foodgeek

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #13 on: December 17, 2010, 08:17:00 AM »
That's pretty much how I make my Yorkshire puddings, too, except that I use about 1/3 of that recipe (1 c. flour, 1 c. milk, 3 eggs), and instead of whisking, I put the ingredients in the blender to whip it all up. I don't take the tin out of the oven, but leave it on the rack, pull the rack out far enough to pour the mixture straight from the blender into the muffin tin.

I find that using the blender not only makes it easier, but it incorporates a lot of air into the batter, which helps the puddings to rise. I hadn't thought about letting the ingredients come up to room temperature, but I may try that and see if it changes my usual results. Thanks.
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Offline Porky Linkster

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Re: Rib Roast
« Reply #14 on: December 17, 2010, 05:23:43 PM »
Thanks for the tip on the blender - I'll definitely give that a try, as well.

 

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