Author Topic: Goose for Christmas dinner  (Read 3847 times)

Offline ginny

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Goose for Christmas dinner
« on: December 09, 2010, 10:16:45 AM »
 a Goose again this year for Christmas dinner.
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Offline Lorenzo

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2010, 10:18:39 AM »
Good for you.  My wife and I love goose.  It's not as much trouble to roast as some people think.

Offline HaagenDazs

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2010, 10:40:00 AM »
It's not as much trouble to roast as some people think.

Depends on how familiar you are with goose.  ;)  My Dad has a story about when he cooked a goose in his frat house in Valparaiso.  He used a small pan or something similar to hold the goose in the oven.  About an hour later people were wondering what was burning.  It was the goose fat that had spilled out of the pan and onto the oven and eventually on to the floor of the kitchen.  Cups of gooey, slick goose fat.  He cleaned most of it up but didn't have the foresight to think that some of the fat had actually spilled out of and underneath the oven itself.  Needless to say, they had another problem a few days later.  Mice.  Fat, happy mice.

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2010, 12:54:31 PM »
I've never cooked one but have seen them around town. I think grilling outside would be the way to go similar to cooking duck. The shame of that is you loose all that wonderful fat.

Offline HaagenDazs

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2010, 01:05:51 PM »
You would save it by collecting it in a drip pan, but it would be smokey.  God help you (and your house, and your neighbor's house, and your cat, etc.) if you set a goose over a grill fire without a drip pan.  :D

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2010, 01:46:48 PM »
« Last Edit: December 09, 2010, 01:57:58 PM by Mike GadgetGeek Stock »
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline ginny

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2010, 02:35:53 PM »
With a commercial goose (one you buy from your local store) there isn't much goose fat. Last year I bought goose livers Schiltz Goose Farms, they were very good but also very expensive. http://www.roastgoose.com/welcome.html. This site has more than "JUST" goose.
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Ginny and Jerry (This is Ginny)
Little Rock, AR USA

Offline Lorenzo

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2010, 03:20:17 PM »
Might as well ask:  Are there any sources of goose raised locally to Atlanta?

Offline HaagenDazs

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2010, 03:25:08 PM »
Nature's Harmony has done them in years past but they decided against processing (as far as I know) this year.  They still have geese on the farm, they raise Plymouth geese, but just not for sale this year.

http://www.naturesharmonyfarm.com/
http://albc-usa.org/cpl/waterfowl/pilgrim.html

Offline KoPP

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #9 on: December 10, 2010, 06:30:44 AM »
I've had goose twice and have never been wanting it since. Does it ever taste non-greasy/gamy?

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #10 on: December 10, 2010, 06:59:40 AM »
I've had goose twice and have never been wanting it since. Does it ever taste non-greasy/gamy?

Yes.   Though like lamb and most other things, what it ate while alive sets up how it is going to taste when cooked.  From my grandmothers table were served wild geese that ate what they foraged, including plenty of fresh shoots of grass and underwater plants, the geese she served tasted quite differently than the farm raised, grain fed, heavy breasted (not that I don't like heavy breasted), birds that I have bought at DFM or elsewhere.  I like a bit of that wild taste personally, I think the fat layer on those wild birds was substantially less than the store-bought ones I have been cooking also?  Whatever Hungarian tricks grandma used on those beautiful, bronze centerpieces were not learned by me, I wish I had paid more attention to what she did.  I am sure she combined available ingredients (in Northern Ohio), to make the stuffing, each of her usual two birds were stuffed. I don't recall them being greasy, nor the dressing being sodden with that fat?  Of course I'm putting to test memories about her holiday table that are easily 45 years old and older.

I have tried over time to cook the birds we can buy using some of the guidance of what they do to Peking duck and it has mostly been successful.  I may give a goose a place on our table sometime before spring?  Each one is an experiment because I don't do them often enough to get the skills honed down to an exact method.

Give a goose a try KoPP, there is way more documentation about how to do it right on YouTube than I ever read or saw.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=cooking+a+goose&aq=f

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Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline KoPP

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #11 on: December 10, 2010, 08:01:40 AM »
I'll give it another shot, however, I won't be making one for myself anytime soon... ;D

Offline Beerbitch

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #12 on: December 10, 2010, 09:09:52 AM »
D'Artagnan has a recipe on their website that I have used where you poach the goose first.

One thing is for sure, no matter how you cook them -- you get plenty of nice good fat!

Offline Lorenzo

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #13 on: December 10, 2010, 09:23:09 AM »
I believe we brined, blanched in boiling water, then let dry for a day uncovered in the fridge before finally roasting.  The skin was fantastically crisp, and the fat rendered out nicely.  I don't recall it being any greasier than, say, turkey dark meat.

I think it's time to do a goose again!

Offline ginny

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Re: Goose for Christmas dinner
« Reply #14 on: December 14, 2010, 03:57:08 PM »
I think I might brine my goose too b4 cooking it.
Shorts Retirement Home
Ginny and Jerry (This is Ginny)
Little Rock, AR USA

 

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