Author Topic: Christmas/Holiday Traditions  (Read 3556 times)

Offline HaagenDazs

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1335
    • Squirrels & Beer
Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« on: December 10, 2009, 01:09:00 PM »
« Last Edit: December 10, 2009, 10:31:40 PM by HaagenDazs »

Offline HaagenDazs

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1335
    • Squirrels & Beer
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2009, 10:29:12 AM »
A day after I posted, this showed up in the NYT.

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/16/dining/16appe.html

Offline Daki

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 21
    • Email
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2009, 03:31:51 PM »
As I mentioned in another thread, my paternal grandfather used to bake tons of cookies, kolaches, and caramels as gifts.

My parents have always bought loaves of stollen , but that NYT recipe looks really good.

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4031
  • Learn something from everyone.
    • Email
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2009, 04:40:00 PM »
As I mentioned in another thread, my paternal grandfather used to bake tons of cookies, kolaches, and caramels as gifts.

My parents have always bought loaves of stollen , but that NYT recipe looks really good. 

Should a bunch of us attempt that recipe and give both our opinion and how we changed it.. (for the Stollen)..

It seems like a different name for a fruit-cake to me so far?   I know it is different and I have NEVER, EVER made a Stollen...

Should we have a Stollen "Throw Down"/"Challenge" and try that one recipe (or others) and have a conversation about it?

.
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline Jmolinari

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1717
    • Email
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2009, 07:53:06 PM »
My tradition is to make the latkes for our channuka party. I use 50/50 soy oil and duck fat.
Everyone always wonders why my latkes taste better...but i'll never tell:)

Offline AndyBoy

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
    • Email
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #5 on: December 16, 2009, 07:56:18 AM »
When my Father-In-Law was alive my wife would made lefsa for him this time of year. It was a pretty detailed process of steaming potatoes and running them through a food mill until they are nice and fluffy and mixing with flour and eggs, etc. She also used her Grandmother's lefsa rolling pin, which has groves to get the finished bread nice and thin. They were then cooked stove top to a slight color. It was a very labor intensive process that took half a day but he loved them and they reminded him of his childhood in North Dakota.

Offline LizR

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1427
    • Email
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2009, 12:46:00 PM »
We always celebrate Polish Wigilia on Christmas Eve with my Mom's family in Buffalo. This is a traditional "lenten" meal that includes a lot of fish and seafood dishes and no meat. After dinner we open the extended family presents (immediate ones are opened on Christmas morning with just imediate family. Have to wait for Santa, after all!). Typical menu prepared by my 84 year old Aunt Dorothy for at least the last 38 years:

vinegar pickled herring and creamed herring on rye bread
mushroom soup made from reconstituted "Polish" mushrooms
fried fish - halibut?
baked salmon in cream sauce
seafood newburg in crepes
fries or tater tots (yes, tater tots)
sauerkraut cooked with yellow split peas
farmer's cheese pierogi served with sour cream for topping
some kind of veggie dish like broccoli with cheese sauce
anise christmas cookies and assorted other cookies
sweet yeast bread with a sugar crumb topping
other things I am forgetting

She always tries to have an odd number of dishes for good luck, but the tallying can be quite creative. Sadly, her husband of more than 50 years died yesterday, so while she was planning on having this dinner on Thursday, I am not sure what will happen this year.

I love family food traditions. Thanks for this thread.



Offline Minerva

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 607
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #7 on: December 16, 2009, 01:46:36 PM »
My antecedents are German, English and Welsh but it was a German/Pennsylvania Dutch breakfast dish that always meant it was holiday time in our family.

Panhaus is basically corn meal boiled in broth, chilled in a loaf pan, sliced and fried in butter. Think polenta, only Nana always added lots of pork sausage and sage to the mix.

Crispy on the outside, served with maple syrup and accompanied by a couple of over-easy eggs, this tastes like Christmas to me. Gotta get on the stick and make a couple batches this weekend.
Fish sauce...for when you want that flavor of cat food and athletic sock...in a good way. - Alton Brown

Offline Jmolinari

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1717
    • Email
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #8 on: December 16, 2009, 01:55:30 PM »
Oh yeah, of course i also have my yearly cotechino party. I make the traditional italian new years meal of cotechino and lentils for luck and money in the new year. Cotechino is an awesome, super rich sausage made from pork and pork skin, and spiced quite heavily.

Offline Roxro

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 161
    • Email
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2009, 04:53:50 PM »
My grandmother and her sisters used to make lefsa for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  I would load a piece up with butter and
cranberry sauce at Thanksgiving and go for butter and granulated sugar at Christmas.  Made them once when I was a teenager but they weren't the same.

A few years ago on a ferry crossing a fjord in Norway, they sold them prepackaged with butter already on them.  Not as good as homemade but the taste was still there.

My grandmother also used to make lutefisk for Christmas along with a turkey and ham.  The smell of the lutefisk along with the gelatinous consistency made me never want to put even the smallest bite of it in my mouth.

But, the best tradition of all, were the different Norwegian cookies- rosettes, fattigman, spritz and sandbakalse and most loved by my daughters- krumkate.  The baking started early in December.  Yum...

Offline uOTPia Dweller

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1180
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2009, 02:46:14 PM »
Gospel of uOTPian dining http://scoopotp.com/author/joe-duffy/

Offline FlyinBrian

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 364
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #11 on: December 22, 2009, 05:03:59 PM »
My maternal grandmother was Sicilian.  When I was growing up we would prepare the full-blown "Feast of the Seven Fishes."  This year we will probably only have three or four different kinds of fish (shrimp, clams, calamari and possibly Snapper) plus Eggplant Parmesan.  I placed my bread order at E.48th Street Market and a few Sfogliatelle.  I will prep eggplant and cook the sauce on Wednesday. The sauce always tastes better the next day.

Offline Minerva

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 607
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2009, 05:58:57 AM »
My maternal grandmother was Sicilian.  When I was growing up we would prepare the full-blown "Feast of the Seven Fishes."  This year we will probably only have three or four different kinds of fish (shrimp, clams, calamari and possibly Snapper) plus Eggplant Parmesan. 

We wanted to do something this year with the fishes, too, FB. Would you share some advice/tips? I've made a red sauce but am unclear on when/how to add the shellfish and which of the many other finny species would be good adds.
Fish sauce...for when you want that flavor of cat food and athletic sock...in a good way. - Alton Brown

Offline The_Scientist

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 531
  • $750 as is, you pay the towing
    • Email
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #13 on: December 23, 2009, 07:37:00 AM »
My mother still does Christmas dinner for whomever shows up, turkey and all of the fixings.  It used to be the only time of the year when she baked cookies - sugar mostly, but my faves by far were chocolate chip.  Hers were incredibly buttery and chewy.  What I remember best was the moment they came out of the oven and she set them on some cut-up brown paper bags to cool.  The moment I could touch them without burning myself was the absolute best time to eat them.  Now that she has grandkids she makes cookies when they're around, but not otherwise.

FG and I are spending the holidays in town.  This will be my first Christmas ever not spent in Pittsburgh.  We will just have to come up with some holiday traditions of our own.
"Crayons taste like purple" - Tardy the Turtle

Offline FlyinBrian

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 364
Re: Christmas/Holiday Traditions
« Reply #14 on: December 23, 2009, 08:57:15 AM »
My maternal grandmother was Sicilian.  When I was growing up we would prepare the full-blown "Feast of the Seven Fishes."  This year we will probably only have three or four different kinds of fish (shrimp, clams, calamari and possibly Snapper) plus Eggplant Parmesan. 

We wanted to do something this year with the fishes, too, FB. Would you share some advice/tips? I've made a red sauce but am unclear on when/how to add the shellfish and which of the many other finny species would be good adds.

My grandmother would cook stuffed calamari in a red sauce and that was her fish sauce.  She would trim the calamari, removing the tentacles and the beak and would end up with something resembling a sock.  These would be stuffed with a breadcrumb mixture of Romano cheese, parsley and garlic and the open end of the "sock" would be closed with a toothpick.  This would cook all day.  The calamari "tubes" would mellow the sauce and would become tender over time where as most other types of fish would get rubbery.  On the other hand, clam sauce is a very quick sauce.  The only difference between red and white clam sauce is a dollop of tomato paste or a splash of tomato sauce.

 

Powered by EzPortal
anything
anything
anything
anything
anything