Author Topic: Poussin  (Read 2230 times)

Offline HaagenDazs

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Poussin
« on: September 24, 2010, 07:28:19 PM »
I stopped by Harry's Alpharetta this morning and saw that they are carrying Ashley Farms poussin.  It was labeled (incorrectly) as Cornish game hens in the cooler, but the label on the bird is clearly poussin.  I assume that these are from their poulet rouge stock, but that's just a guess.  I asked if it was a new item because it was new to me, but the guy behind the counter said they've had them for a long time.  I bought 2 and will grill them for a late dinner tonight.  Good thing they cook fast!  Check it out at Harry's next time if you're interested.

http://www.ashleyfarms.com/poussin.php

Offline LizR

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Re: Poussin
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2010, 12:42:45 PM »
So, HD - how did they turn out? We took our two poulet rouge "cornish game hens" out of the freezer just now, only to discover that we have the same birds you did. Any suggestions?

Thanks!

Offline Lorenzo

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Re: Poussin
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2010, 02:20:24 PM »
According to Wikipedia, in American usage the name is an alternative for Rock Cornish Game Hen: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poussin_(chicken)

Offline LizR

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Re: Poussin
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2010, 03:49:21 PM »
I think these look different than a cornish hen - they are skinnier. Here is the best link I can find, and this is the same company, but ours weigh about 1 1/2 pounds and are not semi-boneless. They were also a lot cheaper than $9 a bird ( I hope!,) my husband bought them at whole foods last time he picked up a poulet rouge chicken.

http://www.joycefoods.com/products.php?catid=6&label=Poussin+Rouge+Fermier+du+Piedmont

Offline LamarT

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Re: Poussin
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2010, 04:16:28 PM »
 :) I have been using poulet rouge birds from Plow Point Farms in Oconee county a lot lately and I have to say these birds are the best.
The poulet rouge has such a great history for being a perfect stuffed under the skin preparation. This is because the skin crisps so
perfectly, with a snap! The meat stays juicy from medium rare to well done. I have cooked it bone-in in the haute cuisine style
with thyme, cumin and garlic goat cheese and Sparkmans butter and it did exactly what it was destined to do. It was destined to be juicy and delicious.
Even made calabash fry then buffalo wings with Sirracha and they remained moist and flavorful.
This weekend I followed classic procedure again (Guess the name of the dish that this is based on!)
and boned the whole chicken intact. Boning a whole bird is difficult at first but once you learn
the way of the chicken it is easy, just start from the bottom, not from the top of the breast and bone from breast to thigh and leg.
Keep the skin from breaking. Cut it in half and remove the silver skin from the thigh and leg.
Saute shiitake mushrooms with garlic and white onions, rosemary and basil. Cool, and then hand mix with feta cheese. Fold the chicken
halves around the mix. Rub with melted olive oil and butter. Roll in panko and flaked sea salt. Roast 21 minutes at 375 degrees.
Serve on rice or polenta. I made a fresh black eyed pea, lime and mizuna relish to go with it.
It was over the top with flavors that I first observed as what approximates what I would imagine Georgia to taste like. Yea, you know
how a dish or combination of flavors can remind you of a place? Well this one is Georgia, everything good about our beautiful state.
I highly recommend buying true poulet rouge and giving a run for the money. Start with the stuffed under the skin recipe
from Juilia Child's Mastering The Art Of French Cooking (as reintroduced to us all by the book/movie Julia And Julia).

Cornish game hens/rock cornish hens are great and versatile fowl. There is every reason in the world to keep these in your
regular monthly rotation of supper menus at home. Poulet rouge is something that is fast becoming a staple for me as well.

Offline HaagenDazs

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Re: Poussin
« Reply #5 on: September 27, 2010, 09:06:02 AM »
They turned out great!  They are smaller than typical Cornish hens (rock, game or otherwise...) you would typically find.  I think mine were about 1.5 pounds each.  At $5 per pound they came out to be $15ish, so Liz, a little cheaper than $9 per bird but not much.  Certainly this isn't an everyday purchase, but it doesn't exactly break the bank either.  I spatchcocked them and grilled them over charcoal with a tiny bit of cherry smoke. 10 minutes breast side down and about 8 on the bone side and about a 10 minute rest under foil while I assembled the rest of the meal (turnip greens and grilled bread).  They cook real fast which is great.  They were probably the best tiny chicken I've had in a long, long while.  They are clearly miles better than the Tyson, Perdue and even Bell& Evans birds, and I wouldn't hesitate to buy them again any day.

 

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