Author Topic: Brewing Beer  (Read 4333 times)

Offline jpellett251

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Brewing Beer
« on: September 13, 2010, 02:54:24 AM »
Anybody else brew their own?  I had done a little then stopped for years and just started back up.  I have my Christmas ale in secondary now (medium strong spiced Belgian with some Lactobacillus added in secondary) and am culturing some yeast from the dregs of a few different De Dolle bottles (Oerbier and Bos Keun).  The starter has activated a little, so we'll see what comes of it.  I'm going for something pale and extremely sessionable (3.5%) with Styrian Goldings and Saaz.  I'll spice it a little, probably use the Lacto again, and do most of the hopping with a dry hop in secondary (high IBUs limit bacterial growth, which is of course usually a good thing, but not if you actually want some bacterial sour).  So many beers I want to make now, so few vessels to ferment them in.

I had been driving up to Alpharetta for beer making supplies until someone told me that Hop City has stuff.  I'm impressed with their selection. 

Offline Lorenzo

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2010, 06:57:34 AM »
Hop City has more supplies than ever.  I haven't been brewing much lately because I just can't seem to find the time, but I've used some grain and yeast I bought there and been pleased.  My last effort, a Belgian abbey style that I brewed in an attempt to use up grain odds and ends and some sugar I brought back from Belgium, turned out poorly.  I've never cultured yeast, so as far as that's concerned you're in unfamiliar territory to me.  With the dozens of varieties available today from Wyeast and White Labs it doesn't seem as useful as it once was.  As for fermenting, I've long been using soda kegs as fermenters--a 10 gallon for primary and 5 gallons secondaries.  It's not any better than a carboy--maybe not as good in some respects--but I'm a stainless steel junkie (see pic).

Offline jpellett251

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2010, 08:05:51 PM »
Yeah, there's not a huge need to do the yeast myself (though there are some yeasts I want that aren't commercially available), but it's mainly that the nerd side of me is excited about maintaining my own collection of brewing critters.

Offline Otto

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2010, 08:21:55 PM »
So where are the best places to buy supplies in the ATL area? 

Offline totm

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2010, 07:47:24 AM »
One of the better places these days is Brew Depot/Beer Necessities.  Though some may question if that is in the ATL area.
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Offline Lorenzo

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2010, 12:39:37 PM »
Yeah, there's not a huge need to do the yeast myself (though there are some yeasts I want that aren't commercially available), but it's mainly that the nerd side of me is excited about maintaining my own collection of brewing critters.

You bet.  I've always wanted to try yeast ranching just for the hell of it.  There are enough commercially available yeasts, though, to keep me busy experimenting for decades.  So you have a stir plate, petri dishes, microscope and all that kind of stuff?

Offline KoPP

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2010, 02:09:53 PM »
I've always wanted to try yeast ranching just for the hell of it.

Beware of the yeast rustlers - sidewinders!

One of these days, I'll start making my own beer. I'm afraid it might be kinda like a tomato lover beginning a few vines, however.

Offline totm

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2010, 03:19:07 PM »
I'm thinking real serious about starting back again.  I just need to get these two monstrous leyland cypress trees by the back deck taken down.  Mash and lauter in the kitchen.  Brew on the deck.  Ferment in the basement.  Bottle by the dishwasher.

I know of one other home brewer on 285F and another that joined AC kinda late.
"It's your last day on earth, what is your final bite to eat?" Eric Ripert

"A good potato with a slab of butter.  I'm a happy man." Joel Robuchon

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2010, 06:56:19 PM »
I was a home brewer fanatic for a few years until work started consuming all of my time but the urge never leaves you. I got rid of all my equipment when we moved intown many years ago but I will probably start up again soon. Saw a book in Borders the other evening titled "Brewing Like A Monk". Mainly Belgian lagers and ales. That is the direction I will go if I ever get into it again. The problem with me is that I am a purist and have to do it all from scratch, crushing and mashing my own grains, to culturing the yeast so it becomes quite an involved process but when you hit that special mark with your brew it is all worth it.

Offline Lorenzo

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2010, 07:21:02 AM »
Saw a book in Borders the other evening titled "Brewing Like A Monk". . . .

Brew Like A Monk is a must if you're interested in Belgian abbey styles.  I found that it leaves unanswered perhaps more questions than it answers, though.

Offline jpellett251

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2010, 04:43:28 PM »
Yeah, there's not a huge need to do the yeast myself (though there are some yeasts I want that aren't commercially available), but it's mainly that the nerd side of me is excited about maintaining my own collection of brewing critters.

You bet.  I've always wanted to try yeast ranching just for the hell of it.  There are enough commercially available yeasts, though, to keep me busy experimenting for decades.  So you have a stir plate, petri dishes, microscope and all that kind of stuff?
My plan had been to get some barrels soon, but decided instead to invest in lab equipment.  Hopefully I'll be set up by the end of the year (having a dad who runs a lab and brewed wine discretely in his parents' basement as a kid should help the cause at Christmas ;D). 

I dumped the De Dolle yeast I was trying to get.  It seemed to be activating for a few days, but it didn't smell great and seemed to stop working.  Oh well.  I still have a bottle of Wyeast Belgian pale so I'll get a starter going tonight and brew tomorrow.

Offline Lorenzo

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2010, 09:07:45 PM »
If you need a soda keg or two, I have extras I could sell.  I used to regularly have three or four beers on tap at any given time, but those days are long gone.

Offline jpellett251

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2010, 09:13:09 PM »
If you need a soda keg or two, I have extras I could sell.  I used to regularly have three or four beers on tap at any given time, but those days are long gone.
I may get back to you about that.  I used to just bottle and was going to start using 5 liter party kegs (I have a mini kegerator for them) but one or two bigger ones could come in handy.

Offline jpellett251

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Re: Brewing Beer
« Reply #13 on: September 18, 2010, 01:11:04 PM »
Just got this one going yesterday:
Specialty grains-8 oz caramunich, 6 oz aromatic, 5 oz biscuit
 
3 lbs light DME, 1 lb muntons wheat DME, .75 oz styrian goldings bittering, , 2 oz dextrin

Flavor: .7 oz saaz, .3 oz bitter orange
Aroma: .1 oz candied ginger, .5 oz saaz, .2 oz sweet orange, 1/2 tsp
coriander (uncrushed volume)

Yeast: white labs wlp570 pale ale

Wort tasted great, I had a big starter so pretty active fermentation started almost immediately, should end up being about 3.5% abv.  I'm excited about this one.

Offline KoPP

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