Author Topic: No salt, no flavor  (Read 2163 times)

Offline Minerva

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No salt, no flavor
« on: May 31, 2010, 08:52:48 AM »
So I've been doing the low fat, low sodium thing for my recovering open heart sweetie and despite all the herbs, spice, lemon, etc. I've been liberally adding, most of the food is barely edible.

Both of us have long liked strong, bold flavors and without a pinch of salt here and there, we're just not getting them. He's losing weight and I need to get more food into him.

Any suggestions out there? I can use all the help I can get. A couple of weeks/months down the road maybe we can use a tad bit of salt but right now I'm counting every mg. of sodium.
Fish sauce...for when you want that flavor of cat food and athletic sock...in a good way. - Alton Brown

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: No salt, no flavor
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2010, 12:18:42 PM »
Thats tough because we are both supposed to be on low sodium diets also and miss the flavor of it. I still use salt only on the foods that need it but try to use it sparingly. Also isn't Kosher salt less salty than other salts? Most of the Indian cookbooks I have used don't really use that much salt and rely on the spices for taste so that might be an option. We have been really checking out the labels on prepared foods and not eatilng the ones that are loaded with sodium.

Offline Minerva

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Re: No salt, no flavor
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2010, 12:44:11 PM »
Also isn't Kosher salt less salty than other salts?

Just looked it up. 1 teaspoon of table salt weighs 6 grams and contains about 2325mg of sodium. A teaspoon of sea salt weighs 5 grams and contains 1872mg of sodium. And a teaspoon of kosher salt weight just 3 grams and contains 1120mg.

He's supposed to have no more than 1200 mg. of sodium per day.

From a low sodium cooking web site, I found this soy sauce substitute. At 68 mg per serving,  it is only a little more than 10% of the sodium in the Kikkoman Lite soy sauce that I used, which is the lowest sodium brand I've been able to find readily available. I think 1 tbsp. is a serving.

4 T Sodium Free Beef Bouillon
4 T Cider Vinegar
2 T Molasses
1 1/2 c Water,Boiling
1/8 t Black Pepper
1/8 t Ginger
1/4 t Garlic Powder
2 T Soy Sauce,Kikkoman Lite
Combine ingredients, stirring to blend thoroughly. Pour into jars. Cover and seal tightly. May be kept refrigerated indefinitely.
Yield: 32 Servings

Fish sauce...for when you want that flavor of cat food and athletic sock...in a good way. - Alton Brown

Offline bigedatl

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Re: No salt, no flavor
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2010, 01:11:41 PM »
Also on low-sodium diet, but not low fat so that helps.

I eat a lot of yogurt for snacks/breakfast. Some brands have a lot more sodium than others.

Use a lot of spices, indian food is lower in salt than many cuisines; potatoes are tough to eat without salt though. Sweet potatoes with some bold spices like coriander and red pepper flakes are great roasted with some olive oil.

I use vinegars a lot. Make my own sodium-free vinaigrette with various vinegars and olive oil.
Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese is I think around 180 mg per ounce, and an ounce of that grated finely on a microplane fills like half a bowl, and adds a lot of flavor. I also use Emmentaler swiss, but thats not low-fat.

There are some good brands of canned tomatoes that are no-sodium added so they have maybe 40 mg per serving, as opposed to 300-400 mg per serving. Riga(?) San Marzano at YDFM is the one I usually use, its less than $3 a 28 oz can with the case discount, they are organic also. My Publix started carrying a no- or low-sodium added San Marzano tomato as well for around $3/can, forget the name. Publix also has a regular canned tomato that is very low in sodium that again is not marked as such. These are not labeled no or low-sodium on the can, you just have to read the nutrition facts.

I use a lot of chicken stock. The major brands labeled low-sodium really aren't. I use Kitchen Basics no-salt added. It helps in things, although if you taste it straight up it doesn't taste so good.

When I use salt its usually to finish or when it will be on the surface of the food so you get the most taste bang for the buck. Kosher since its lower in sodium and I always measure salt.

It does get better over time. Some things (mostly processed or fast-foods) I used to love taste horrible to me now, like McDonalds Sausage Biscuit.

Offline AndyBoy

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Re: No salt, no flavor
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2010, 04:12:08 PM »
Pomi tomatoes from Italy have no salt added and we use those a lot. I add salt to them but can control the amount. It's funny but everytime we eat a nice meal at a restaurant I can't believe how salty the food is. Most, especially high end restaurants, way oversalt the food in my opinion.

Offline Jmolinari

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Re: No salt, no flavor
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2010, 08:32:51 PM »
i'v heard that taste buds re-adjust  to salt levels in about 2 weeks

Loundry

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Re: No salt, no flavor
« Reply #6 on: June 20, 2010, 08:55:49 AM »
I moved in with temporary guardians when I was in high school, and they were midwesterners (which, to me, meant they were Yankees).  They almost never used salt in anything.  This was shocking to me, having grown up eating Southern green beans and sliced tomatoes with salt.  I remember having to get up from the table every night to go into the kitchen to get the salt shaker (it wasn't kept on the dinner table) and I felt embarrassed by it.  Eventually, I got used to it.  I'm not sure how long that took, I'd say it took two to three weeks.  Are most people going to be like me in that regard?  I have no idea, but, in your case, I hope it is true.

Offline Minerva

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Re: No salt, no flavor
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2010, 09:36:38 AM »
What's happened is that if I really feel I need to use it in cooking, like on meat or fish before cooking, I measure exactly 1/4 tsp. of kosher salt and sprinkle it over all of raw product. No more, no less. It spreads the sodium out so no one portion has more than what SO (and I) should be having. And it seems to be exactly enough.

I do believe we are adjusting to less sodium. For example, I used to salt the water for shrimp or pasta but now find that they taste just fine without it.
Fish sauce...for when you want that flavor of cat food and athletic sock...in a good way. - Alton Brown

 

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