Author Topic: My Grandparents House  (Read 2588 times)

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4031
  • Learn something from everyone.
    • Email
My Grandparents House
« on: October 22, 2009, 10:49:53 AM »
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

Offline Marmite Loving Euniculus

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 158
    • Email
Re: My Grandparents House
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2009, 09:43:36 AM »
I remember as a small child I would watch my grandmother cook and can her tomatoes, grapes, corn, and kraut. While I never did pick up the art, it was always fascinating to watch.

Loundry

  • Guest
Re: My Grandparents House
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2009, 01:13:01 PM »
Canning was my grandmother's solemn, and often sole, duty after my grandfather planted a garden that could feed his family many times over.  My grandparents' house was always filled with glass jars full of squash, tomatoes, green beans, and many kinds of preserves, particularly peach, fig, strawberry, and (my favorite) pear.  It's strange to think of canned food as a remnant of poverty and the great depression, which it certainly was.  To me, it always looked like abundance and security.

My grandparents never made pickles, kraut, or fermented anything.  They did recently recount to me a story of old-time hog killings, back when they were children in the 30s and 40s.  My grandmother told me about how the pork meat was made into sausage, cooked, and then packed into a crock in between layers of hot, melted lard.  She also mentioned that it was immersed into a running stream and that it "never made anyone sick".  A different time.  I often wonder what other kinds of culinary throwbacks they've shaken off in place of modern conveniences.  It's a never-ending weird feeling that the freedom my grandparents found is what foodies consider an inauthentic perversion of real food, and I'm guilty of feeling that way to some degree.

My grandmother often baked pies and cakes.  Well, it was more like pie and cakes, as the only pie I remember her baking was pecan (pee-can) pie.  The abundant and prolific pecan trees on their farm in South Georgia provided.  It still galls me a little to pay $6 / lb for what used to be ammunition (that's especially true for muscadines).  Coconut cake, caramel cake, pound cake, angel food cake.  I used to eat so much more cake.  My grandparents had ten grandchildren so there was always a cake-ready mouth nearby.

Offline Poppa Bass

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Re: My Grandparents House
« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2009, 12:26:28 PM »
My most distinct memories of my granparents house ( on dad's side ) were the apples.
 
We lived adjacent to their house for a few years and the orchards were filled with a few other ( pear, peach, plum )trees, but primarily it was apples. Wonderful green (probably Granny Smith ? ), the HARD apples ( "don't eat those, they're for the cider " ), a really delicious
one I remember as yellow with red lines/streaks, and maybe two or three other varieties.
It seemed like there was ALWAYS fresh-baked pies on the ledge to cool, and the warning "Don't touch those !! ". Another 'apple' treat was grandma's fritters. Now in my early sixties, I can still close my eyes and remember the smell AND the taste. Still recall the powdered
sugar to top them and the MARVELOUS filling.

The trees are now gone and so are my grandparents and parents too, but the memories will never leave me.
My Goal In Life Is To Be As Good As My Dogs Thinks I Am

Offline Mike GadgetGeek Stock

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4031
  • Learn something from everyone.
    • Email
Re: My Grandparents House
« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2009, 12:35:34 PM »
My most distinct memories of my granparents house ( on dad's side ) were the apples.
 
We lived adjacent to their house for a few years and the orchards were filled with a few other ( pear, peach, plum )trees, but primarily it was apples. Wonderful green (probably Granny Smith ? ), the HARD apples ( "don't eat those, they're for the cider " ), a really delicious
one I remember as yellow with red lines/streaks, and maybe two or three other varieties.
It seemed like there was ALWAYS fresh-baked pies on the ledge to cool, and the warning "Don't touch those !! ". Another 'apple' treat was grandma's fritters. Now in my early sixties, I can still close my eyes and remember the smell AND the taste. Still recall the powdered
sugar to top them and the MARVELOUS filling.

The trees are now gone and so are my grandparents and parents too, but the memories will never leave me.

Good to see your memory is still sound PB..   Do you also remember the two ratty trees that were in the side yard (actually by the old niteclub)?  Those almost-always wormy apple looking trees were quince trees.  Way back when the trees were younger, and grandpa could trim and tend them, some of the most interesting tart deserts and canned preserves came off of those two trees. 

.
Finding offense where none is intended is a form of selfishness.

When facts change, I change my mind.  What do you do?

It's a poor craftsman that blames his tools.

 

Powered by EzPortal
anything
anything
anything