285 Foodies

Cooking At Home & Shopping => Cooking at Home or with friends => Topic started by: AndyBoy on December 23, 2009, 10:47:18 AM

Title: Breakfast
Post by: AndyBoy on December 23, 2009, 10:47:18 AM
Thought we could use a Breakfast thread even though I hardly every have a "real" breakfast except maybe on weekends. This was last weekend, poached eggs and thinly sliced duck breast. I will take that over bacon any day of the week.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Northside Food on December 23, 2009, 10:03:02 PM
I'm making brunch tomorrow for the two of us and a friend.  Applesauce oatmeal muffins with cinnamon honey butter and assorted jellies, thick cut pepper bacon, and a winter fruit salad (pears, apples, dried apricots, cherries, toasted pecans and pomegranates tossed in a vanilla dressing).
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: AndyBoy on January 03, 2010, 05:05:40 PM
We had duck breast last night and I pan seared them instead of grilling outside so I had plenty of duck fat. This morning I grated a potato, squeezed the moisture out and made a potato cake in duck fat. There is something about potatoes and duck fat, they are made for each other.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Melomom on March 10, 2010, 06:54:16 AM
Article by John Edge in today's NYT about breakfast tacos in Austin:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/10/dining/10united.html?8dpc
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Northside Food on May 30, 2010, 09:48:43 AM
Yesterday's was scrambled eggs with cheese, fruit salad (mango, peaches and strawberries) and toast with goat cheese.

Today was sausage patties on homemade biscuits with more fruit salad. This time, I added some lemon mint balm from my herb garden to the salad.  The sausage we picked up at the Riverside market from a family farm in Madison. The guy selling it had a special of 2 pounds for 5 dollars, which we thought was a fair price for local, sustainably raised meat.  We'll buy more from them in the future.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Corky on May 31, 2010, 04:42:33 PM
How about something from our house? Country ham, red eye gravy, cantaloupe and blueberries, cheese grits (smoked gouda), fried eggs and whole wheat pancakes with real maple syrup. It's a never fail guest pleaser (unless you are a yankee).
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: rwcohen on May 31, 2010, 05:39:26 PM
How about something from our house? Country ham, red eye gravy, cantaloupe and blueberries, cheese grits (smoked gouda), fried eggs and whole wheat pancakes with real maple syrup. It's a never fail guest pleaser (unless you are a yankee).

Ok, I'm coming for breakfast real soon.......


thankyouverymuch
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: LizR on June 02, 2010, 09:22:10 PM
How about something from our house? Country ham, red eye gravy, cantaloupe and blueberries, cheese grits (smoked gouda), fried eggs and whole wheat pancakes with real maple syrup. It's a never fail guest pleaser (unless you are a yankee).

Just curious - what don't the yankees like, the country ham?
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Foodgeek on June 02, 2010, 10:39:27 PM
How about something from our house? Country ham, red eye gravy, cantaloupe and blueberries, cheese grits (smoked gouda), fried eggs and whole wheat pancakes with real maple syrup. It's a never fail guest pleaser (unless you are a yankee).

Yep, count me as another Yankee who has no idea why I'd not like any of these things, if they were served to me.

When it comes to Picc-yer-own-darned-dilly Cafeteria, I admit that I hate steam table garbage, but nothing in your description sounds yucky. Real maple syrup comes from New England and Canada, by the way, so I totally don't get the idea that Yankees won't be pleased.

Is smoked gouda indigenous to our area?
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: totm on June 03, 2010, 01:05:46 PM
How about something from our house? Country ham, red eye gravy, cantaloupe and blueberries, cheese grits (smoked gouda), fried eggs and whole wheat pancakes with real maple syrup. It's a never fail guest pleaser (unless you are a yankee).
Yep, count me as another Yankee who has no idea why I'd not like any of these things, if they were served to me.
Count me as a Damn Yankee (card carrying one for 36 non-contiguous years) who just doesn't get country ham, red eye gravy, and grits. My southern sister in law used to make country ham for my Damn Yankee father for his birthday so it is not hereditary.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Jmolinari on June 03, 2010, 01:19:21 PM
this weekend i was in NY, and had dinner at Ssam Bar, where they serve 4 or 5 different country hams.
They're sliced super thin, and served like prosciutto. I must say, they had nothing to envy Prosciutto di Parma, they were saltier, but equally delicious.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Corky on June 03, 2010, 06:14:55 PM
I apologize if I offended some of you by my "yankee" comment. Which prompts me to explain. When we have visitors from outside the South, most, not all, prefer not to have grits fixed in any manner, nor country ham or livermush. Whereas, visitors originally from the South tend to prefer a typical "Southern" breakfast. I will admit I have had some northern visitors ask where I get my country ham or grits for example. After they go home and I ask them if they had ordered some, you wouldn't believe some of the side comments, such as, "It would just go to waste." Which to me is a slap in the face.
Pancakes (in some form) are a pretty standard breakfast item around the world. I have my own recipe that I make from scratch. I prefer either Canadian or New England maple syrup, although there are some North Carolina farms that are producing very good syrup in very limited quantities. Sorghum is also used with pancakes, but I prefer the maple syrup from up north. So to answer some of you, I guess we just eat what we like no matter where it comes from. We also know what to buy at the grocery store in case we have some visitors that are not accustomed our family's way of eating.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Foodgeek on June 03, 2010, 10:22:00 PM
I will admit I have had some northern visitors ask where I get my country ham or grits for example. After they go home and I ask them if they had ordered some, you wouldn't believe some of the side comments, such as, "It would just go to waste." Which to me is a slap in the face.

I'm so sorry you felt that way, but my first thought would have been about the minimum quantities for shipping. Most visitors or transplanted northerners don't want to order a whole, or even half, country ham, and it's great to have good grits, but only if you know to keep them in the freezer. On top of that, there are so many things you might need to know, like how to prepare grits or country ham, and how to present them to people not familiar with them.

I hope no one meant to slap you in the face and you could get past this assumption.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: LizR on June 03, 2010, 10:27:04 PM
And I, as technically a half Northerner and a half Southerner at this point, was certainly not offended, just curious. Growing up outside of Buffalo, we often had grits for breakfast, and I get the redeye gravy thing, but still not exactly the country ham thing. We even went to the Trigg Co Kentucky Ham Festival about 10 years ago just to investigate and get a true country ham, but despite the soaking it was just too salty and tough for our tastes.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Minerva on June 04, 2010, 07:09:12 AM
I ordered a whole smoked country ham at the holidays. Still have most of it in the freezer. As Northside Food said, we found it tough and too salty, despite our best efforts at trying different methods of cooking or just slicing thin and eating it with other items.

And yes, I am not a born Southerner.  :)
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Jmolinari on June 04, 2010, 07:59:31 AM
i'm "this" close to ordering a whole country ham from the place that we tried at Ssam bar....broadbent hams i think...
this things are so cheap....like $60 for a 15lb ham!?!
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: totm on June 04, 2010, 08:18:14 AM
I apologize if I offended some of you by my "yankee" comment.
Not offended by your "yankee" comment at all.  A LOT of people that currently live within and slightly outside of 285 are damn Yankees (Yes LizR, you ARE a damn Yankee. As well as FoodGeek, KoPP, BeerBitch, GadgetGeek, InternationalCalUotpiaGrubberVulcanDweller, and many others).

There are certain staples that are associated with Southern food that I love (fried chicken, corn bread - if done right, bowl of beans) that my damn Yankee wife can't stand.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: jimmy on June 04, 2010, 08:36:29 AM
i make breakfast burritos probably 3-4 times a week. Any combination of scrambled egg, salsa, cheese, diced potato, sausage, bacon, ham, in a tortilla.

On occasion I do them ahead of time and freeze them. They reheat well.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Jmolinari on June 04, 2010, 08:57:13 AM

On occasion I do them ahead of time and freeze them. They reheat well.

yup. Haven't made them in a while.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: jpellett251 on June 16, 2010, 12:53:44 AM
I grew up in Atlanta (got here when I was 5) but I don't think I've ever had country ham or red eye gravy and I've only actually had grits once or twice, though I don't remember caring much for them.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: The_Scientist on June 20, 2010, 01:39:58 PM
A special Father's Day breakfast from FG: shrimp and grits topped with a fried egg.  It was her way of saying thanks for being a good daddy to the cats.  Oh, and after two years together she still loves me.  AWWWWW!  Isn't that just so cute you want to puke your guts out?
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Northside Food on June 20, 2010, 08:18:50 PM
I should have made my husband a special breakfast to celebrate all his years of parenting our stuffed panda bears.  He is a pretty good panda parent, after all.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: KoPP on June 21, 2010, 06:50:17 AM
All those people I see downtown should make me breakfast on Mother's Day - they call me a mother every time they try to cross the street.

I got a number of "Happy Father's Day" from servers, barts, and even at church - I'm wondering what they know that I don't?
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Lorenzo on June 21, 2010, 08:29:53 AM
Sunday, we made ourselves what we think of as a Thai-style congee--one of our favorite breakfasts--in celebration of me being a father of no one!
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Northside Food on June 21, 2010, 08:59:32 PM
Today I had peanut butter and banana oatmeal. It was very yum.
Title: Re: Breakfast
Post by: Mike GadgetGeek Stock on November 27, 2011, 09:11:35 AM

Shrimp and grits for breakfast/brunch today..I'm using an old recipe <but I've changed it a bit>

<< added after brunch >>  This is possibly the best Shrimp and Grits recipe I have ever fixed.  I am not in love with the flour coated shrimp but would next time quickly sear the shrimp and add a flour/milk slurry to thicken the sauce.  This is an amazing recipe.  I'll put a corrected recipe in the recipe section today. 

<Now Altered>

Best Shrimp and Grits Recipe Ingredients

2 cups water <shrimp stock made from shells and onion peels, a bay leaf and some scallion tops>
1 14.5 can <1 3/4 cup> chicken <Turkey> broth
1 can evaporated milk  <1/4 cup of 2% milk>
salt and pepper to taste
1 cup grits (not quick cooking grits)  <Jim Dandy quick cooking grits>
3/4 cup cheddar  <Gouda >cheese, shredded
1/4 cup parmesan  <Asiago> cheese, shredded
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 teaspoon Crystal hot sauce (adjust to taste preference)
3 <2> slices bacon (optional)
1 <3/4>  pound peeled and deveined <small fresh NBF Georgia white> shrimp
1/4 cup flour
1 cup mushrooms, sliced (optional)
1/2 cup chopped green onions
2 cloves chopped garlic
1/2 cup chicken <turkey> broth
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1/4 teaspoon <Tabasco> hot sauce (adjust to taste)
lemon wedges

Best Shrimp and Grits Recipe Instructions

Bring first 3 ingredients to a boil. Add the grits a little at a time, mixing with a whisk or fork. Reduce heat and simmer for about 10 minutes or until grits become thick. Stir occasionally to avoid lumps. Add salt and pepper, cheeses, 2 tablespoons butter, and 1/2 teaspoon hot sauce. Keep warm.

Cut bacon into one inch pieces. Fry in a skillet until crispy. Remove from skillet and save about 1 tablespoon of the bacon drippings. Crumble the bacon after it has cooled.

Season the shrimp with salt and pepper. Coat in flour. Saute the mushrooms and green onions in the bacon drippings for about 5 minutes or til tender. Add the garlic and coated shrimp to the skillet. Saute for about 3 minutes, until shrimp are browned. Add all of the rest of the ingredients except for the lemon wedges. Cook for about 3 more minutes, stirring as it cooks.

Take the cooked grits that you've set aside and divide them up into four bowls. Add the shrimp mixture on top of the grits in each bowl. Add crumbled bacon to each bowl. Serve with lemon wedges on the side.

.....