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Cooking At Home & Shopping => Cooking at Home or with friends => Topic started by: Minerva on December 18, 2009, 01:47:33 PM

Title: Country ham
Post by: Minerva on December 18, 2009, 01:47:33 PM
I ordered an aged country ham from a small Tennessee smokehouse and should have known I was in trouble when they were vague about the weight, saying each one varies.

It came today and it's a monster. Actually, two of them are crowding my fridge because one is a Christmas gift for relatives.

I love the idea of aged country ham but am clueless on how to use it other than the traditional biscuits, eggs and ham thang. Isn't country ham too salty to eat on its own?

Any suggestions? Does the meat freeze successfully?
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Jmolinari on December 18, 2009, 01:57:34 PM
The momofuku cookbook says to eat it just like a prosciutto, sliced really thin.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Minerva on December 18, 2009, 02:01:38 PM
Really? That's terrific. Thanks. Do you by any chance know if it survives freezing well?

We also ordered the smokehouse's prosciutto and some of their bacon. Actually, we found them because a local chef turned us on to the bacon, which is indeed the best I've ever had.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: HaagenDazs on December 18, 2009, 02:02:53 PM
I'm pretty sure you can freeze it too.  You'll need a hacksaw with a clean (new) blade but you can hack off pieces/slices.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: KoPP on December 18, 2009, 02:06:19 PM
http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/country-ham-recipe/index.html (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/country-ham-recipe/index.html)
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Jmolinari on December 18, 2009, 02:09:13 PM
Friend of mine did the Good Eats country ham recipe and said it was pretty awesome.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Minerva on December 18, 2009, 02:10:49 PM
Actually, it's already sliced but still on the bone. But I think I can use the basics of Alton's recipe (thank you!) on slices rather than the whole ham.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Melomom on December 18, 2009, 04:21:43 PM
It came today and it's a monster.

I think Dorothy Parker said "Eternity is two people and a ham."   :) 
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Corky on December 20, 2009, 07:35:07 AM
I usually buy my country ham already sliced. If I am serving it to guests that don't care for the saltiness, I will soak it overnight in buttermilk. I used to buy whole cured country hams but decided I wasted too much. I routinely freeze my packaged ham slices and have never had a problem. If you would like I will give you the names of the 2 country ham providers I use. They are relatively inexpensive for already sliced ham around $6/lb. I don't have it shipped to me, but buy it when I am in North Carolina.
Guess I'll have to make up some biscuits, thaw out some ham, cook it in an iron skillet and then make some redeye gravy for breakfast this morning. Geez, I'm glad I ran across this message.

Corky
"3 burritos, a Pedro's tamale and a bowl of Texas Red on this empty seat beside me"
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Loundry on December 28, 2009, 07:37:55 AM
I'd like to read a taste test of country hams eaten like prosciutto: eaten raw, sliced thin.  I've read that people can eat country ham this way, but I haven't heard any reports of how favorably it compared to other dry-cured hams.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Minerva on December 28, 2009, 07:49:40 AM
We have nibbled on some of the "raw" slices and they are deeply flavorful, but the salt factor is omnipresent. Balanced with melon slices, however, they are quite good.

BTW, the smokehouse recommends a quick pan fry for slices with a bit of black coffee and brown sugar. Supposed to cut the salt. We're trying this method later this week.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: KoPP on December 28, 2009, 08:17:47 AM
We have nibbled on some of the "raw" slices and they are deeply flavorful, but the salt factor is omnipresent. Balanced with melon slices, however, they are quite good.

BTW, the smokehouse recommends a quick pan fry for slices with a bit of black coffee and brown sugar. Supposed to cut the salt. We're trying this method later this week.

I wonder if potatoes would help with the salt as well - mebbe hashbrowns?
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Barnum on December 28, 2009, 08:20:14 AM
a quick pan fry for slices with a bit of black coffee and brown sugar

That certainly sounds tasty.  Slapped into a steaming fresh biscuit and I'm not sure you could beat it.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Minerva on December 28, 2009, 01:52:24 PM
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: BBQgeek on January 01, 2010, 04:02:40 PM
I published an article on a recipe I came across that is similar to the Alton Brown rehydrated ham recipe.  Check it out.  http://www.bbqgeek.com/2009/11/rehydrated-country-ham-recipe.html

I really enjoyed the recipe, but I can't stress how important it is to change the water frequently and go for as many days as make sense.  3 would have been good in my case.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: AndyBoy on August 15, 2010, 09:42:52 AM
Is there anywhere local, good, authentic country ham can be purchased? We will be using it for ham and biscuits as an hors d'oeuvre.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Jmolinari on August 15, 2010, 09:45:44 AM
The only country hams i've seen around here are the standard Smithfield ones. I don't know if they're good or bad. I'm thinking of ordering a whole one from Broadbent..i can't believe how cheap they are.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: LizR on August 15, 2010, 10:24:29 AM
I haven't seen much variety around here but I think Smithfield will work fine.

I few years ago we made a pilgrimage to the Trigg Co Ham Festival in Western Kentucky and picked up a ham to bring back. We soaked it and soaked it and boiled it and roasted it but it was still really, really salty and tough. I would try doing it again bc I think we probably did something wrong. Most fun part of that trip was stumbling into a horsepull - really beautiful and awe-inspiring animals. Driving around the countryside seeing the smokehouses was cool too. That Land Between the Lakes area is beautiful.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: AndyBoy on August 15, 2010, 03:17:40 PM
The only country hams i've seen around here are the standard Smithfield ones. I don't know if they're good or bad. I'm thinking of ordering a whole one from Broadbent..i can't believe how cheap they are.


Jason if you need a whole ham I didn't see those but YDFM had sliced Broadbent ham from Kentucky. We got three packs today of the biscuit slices but they had other styles as well.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Jmolinari on August 15, 2010, 07:26:28 PM
Really? YDFM has Broadbent? Wow...i'll have to stop in to get some. But it's probably sliced thick right? I was thinking of getting one to slice like a prosciutto. Had it in NYC and it was GOOD
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: AndyBoy on August 16, 2010, 07:08:55 AM
I can't remember what the other slice styles were called but there were different slice thickness I think. Ours look to be 1/8" or maybe just under.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: bettylouski on August 16, 2010, 08:49:49 AM
Really? YDFM has Broadbent? Wow...i'll have to stop in to get some. But it's probably sliced thick right? I was thinking of getting one to slice like a prosciutto. Had it in NYC and it was GOOD


YDFM has several different variety of their bacons, too, and they rock!  Very, very smoky.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Corky on November 03, 2010, 09:46:43 AM
I believe Ingles carries Smithfield and Clifty Farms in pre-packaged slices. I don't care for the biscuit slices because they are too thin and become crispy very fast. I prefer the 1/4" slices for biscuits. Also, with the 1/4" slices you'll have a little fat, so when it is cooked you have enough leftover grease to make red eye gravy to either poor on the biscuit or dunk the biscuit.
Title: ham
Post by: ginny on December 09, 2010, 10:15:50 AM
I just bought a "COOKS" ham.  Brought it home and made pkgs for freezer of sliced ham, a ham roast (FOR New Years Day dinner), and cubed ham for freezer and the bone I'm using for ham and pea soup.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: LizR on April 16, 2012, 11:18:02 AM
Any ideas to use up ham leftovers besides soup? I really like having leftover ham, but this year I'm a bit stumped.

Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: LizR on April 16, 2012, 12:05:13 PM
Oops, could have sworn I posted in a plain "ham" thread, not country ham. I'll poke around later and move it.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Jmolinari on April 16, 2012, 03:59:39 PM
pasta with ham, peas and cream is a classic
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Corky on April 16, 2012, 04:36:58 PM
Actually, I am fixing 'scalloped potatoes and ham' tonight.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Melomom on April 16, 2012, 05:41:46 PM
My family loves ham biscuits for breakfast. Freeze what you can't use right away and pull out a bit at a time.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: LizR on April 17, 2012, 01:39:16 PM
Thanks guys!

Jason - it is funny that you suggested that bc that was our original recipe plan last night. It will be dinner one ngiht this week for sure. What shape pasta do you like with it?
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: Jmolinari on April 17, 2012, 01:55:52 PM
a heavy shape b/c of the cream. Penne or rigatoni. Fusilli would work too as it would gather the cream in the spirals.
Title: Re: Country ham
Post by: LizR on April 17, 2012, 03:02:19 PM
Thanks. I'm thinking fusilli.